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Enron and the domino effect


  • Paul Marinescu

    (Faculty of Bussines and Administration, University of Bucharest, Romania)


This paper aims to present the effects of Enron's 2001 collapse has had on the business environment looked upon systemically, analyzing the interdependencies the American giant had with other components of this environment especially those that should have played and important system control role such as audit firms, financial analysts and investment banks. The premises from which we start are that exactly the failure of these control instruments has led to the escalation of the situation up to the point in which the fall becomes inevitable. I believe that this analysis can offer relevant lessons for the key on how the current situation of Greece must be judged, a subject of utmost importance.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Marinescu, 2012. "Enron and the domino effect," Manager Journal, Faculty of Business and Administration, University of Bucharest, vol. 15(1), pages 15-19, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:but:manage:v:15:y:2012:i:1:p:15-19

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dean F. Amel & Colleen Barnes & Fabio Panetta & Carmelo Salleo, 2002. "Consolidation and efficiency in the financial sector: a review of the international evidence," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-47, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Dean Amel & Colleen Barnes & Fabio Panetta & Carmelo Salleo, 2002. "Consolidation and efficiency in the financial sector: a review of the international evidence," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 464, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
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    More about this item


    Enron; Banckruptcy; Fraud; Stakeholders; Budgets;


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