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Is Sustainable Development Compatible with Rawlsian Justice?


  • Raymond Francis E

    () (Bellarmine University)


Does economic justice stymie economic development? This paper demonstrates that sustainability is compatible with Rawlsian intertemporal justice, even when considering human capital and natural resources. The methodology employed herein extends and amends previous works that (1) do not consider human capital or renewable resources, and (2) rely upon the application of standard Lagrangian methodology to a continuum of nonlinear constraints. This approach circumvents problems associated with earlier works by internalizing constraints and demonstrating two sufficient conditions which guarantee existence of a Rawlsian maximin path.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymond Francis E, 2006. "Is Sustainable Development Compatible with Rawlsian Justice?," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-24, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejtec:v:contributions.6:y:2006:i:1:n:6

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Jullien, Bruno, 2000. "Participation Constraints in Adverse Selection Models," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 1-47, July.
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