IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bpj/bejmac/vtopics.5y2005i1n20.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Human Capital and Growth: An Alternative Accounting

Author

Listed:
  • Rangazas Peter C

    () (IUPUI)

Abstract

This paper re-examines the importance of human capital in explaining economic growth. Previous studies are extended by including schooling investments of both time and goods within the school year, a human capital externality, and imperfect substitution between white collar and manual tasks. The model of worker productivity used to conduct the growth accounting is consistent with (1) rates of return to time and goods investment in education, (2) white collar wage premia, and (3) trendless worker productivity growth rates in the United States over the 20th century. The analysis suggests that about one third of United States growth over this period was related to human capital accumulation, accounting for an average annual growth rate of 0.6 to 0.7 percent. The model also implies that neoclassical inputs can account for 5.5 to 8.5-fold differences in worker productivity across rich and poor countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Rangazas Peter C, 2005. "Human Capital and Growth: An Alternative Accounting," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-43, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:topics.5:y:2005:i:1:n:20
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejm.2005.5.1/bejm.2005.5.1.1307/bejm.2005.5.1.1307.xml?format=INT
    Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Razzak, Weshah, 2005. "Explaining the gaps in labour productivity in some developed countries," MPRA Paper 1888, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised May 2006.
    2. Strauss, Jack, 2013. "The Economic Gains to Colorado of Amendment 66," MPRA Paper 49928, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Growiec, Jakub, 2010. "Human Capital, Aggregation, And Growth," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(02), pages 189-211, April.
    4. Growiec, Katarzyna & Growiec, Jakub, 2014. "Social Capital, Trust, And Multiple Equilibria In Economic Performance," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(02), pages 282-315, March.
    5. Seung Mo Choi, 2008. "How Large are Learning Externalities? Measurement by Calibration," Working Papers 2008-26, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
    6. Adelaja, Adesoji O. & Hailu, Yohannes G. & Abdulla, Majd, 2009. "New Economy Growth Decomposition in the U.S," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49579, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Razzak, Weshah, 2006. "Explaining the gaps in labour productivity for some developed countries," MPRA Paper 53, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Razzak, W.A., 2007. "Explaining The Gaps In Labour Productivity In Some Developed Countries: New Zealand, Australia, The United States And Canada, 1988-2004," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 7(2).
    9. Paul W. Bauer & Mark E. Schweitzer & Scott Shane, 2006. "State growth empirics: the long-run determinants of state income growth," Working Paper 0606, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:topics.5:y:2005:i:1:n:20. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.degruyter.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.