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Matching, Search, and Heterogeneity

Author

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  • Shimer Robert

    () (Princeton)

  • Smith Lones

    () (University of Michigan)

Abstract

This paper explores the efficiency of decentralized search behavior and matching patterns in a model with ex ante heterogeneity and a constant returns to scale search technology. We show that a linear tax or subsidy on search intensity decentralizes the social optimum. In the absence of the tax, high productivity agents are too willing to match, yet they search too little. Low productivity agents have the opposite behavior. As a result, the equilibrium is always inefficient in the absence of taxes, in contrast to known results on the efficiency of decentralized search models with homogeneous agents. We relate the inefficiencies to thick-market and congestion externalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Shimer Robert & Smith Lones, 2001. "Matching, Search, and Heterogeneity," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-18, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:advances.1:y:2001:i:1:n:5
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mukoyama, Toshihiko & Sahin, Aysegül, 2009. "Specialization and efficiency with labor-market matching," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 221-236, January.
    2. Blázquez, Maite & Jansen, Marcel, 2008. "Search, mismatch and unemployment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 498-526, April.
    3. Gaetano Antinolfi & Francesca Carapella & Charles Kahn & Antoine Martin & David Mills & Ed Nosal, 2015. "Repos, Fire Sales, and Bankruptcy Policy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(1), pages 21-31, January.
    4. Claudio Michelacci & Javier Suarez, 2006. "Incomplete Wage Posting," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(6), pages 1098-1123, December.
    5. Batyra, Anna & Sneessens, Henri R., 2010. "Selective reductions in labor taxation: Labor market adjustments and macroeconomic performance," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 531-543, July.
    6. Arnaud Chéron & Jean‐Olivier Hairault & François Langot, 2011. "Age‐Dependent Employment Protection," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(557), pages 1477-1504, December.
    7. Chéron, Arnaud & Rouland, Bénédicte, 2011. "Endogenous job destructions and the distribution of wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 845-852.
    8. Eleftheriou, Konstantinos, 2011. "Efficiency and specialization: A search theoretic approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 229-238.
    9. YIlmaz, Ensar, 2011. "Income distribution, efficiency and rationing," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1247-1255, May.
    10. Godfrey Keller & Kevin Roberts & Margaret Stevens, 2007. "Unemployment, Participation and Market Size," Economics Series Working Papers 362, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    11. Matteo Richiardi, 2003. "A Search Model of Unemployment and Firm Dynamics," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 30, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    12. Woodcock Simon D, 2010. "Heterogeneity and Learning in Labor Markets," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-69, September.
    13. Bruno Decreuse, 2008. "Choosy Search And The Mismatch Of Talents," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(3), pages 1067-1089, August.
    14. Ronald Bachmann, 2005. "Skill mismatch in equilibrium unemployment," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-034, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany, revised Aug 2005.
    15. Ettore Damiano & Hao Li & Wing Suen, 2005. "Unravelling of Dynamic Sorting," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(4), pages 1057-1076.
    16. Blázquez Cuesta, Maite & Jansen, Marcel, 2003. "Efficiency in a Matching Model with Heterogeneous Agents: Too Many Good or Bad Jobs?," IZA Discussion Papers 968, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Richard Wallick, 2012. "Agent-based modeling, public choice, and the legacy of Gordon Tullock," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 223-244, July.
    18. Robert Dixon & John Freebairn & Emayenesh Seyoum-Tegegn, 2008. "State & Territory Beveridge Curvesand the National Equilibrium Unemployment Rate," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1033, The University of Melbourne.
    19. repec:bla:jpbect:v:19:y:2017:i:5:p:957-985 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Yuliia Stupnytska & Anna Zaharieva, 2017. "Optimal policy and the role of social contacts in a search model with heterogeneous workers," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 19(5), pages 957-985, October.

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