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The Heifer, The Goat and The Sheep in Company with The Lion


  • de la Fontaine Jean


This fable was published for the first time in 1668 in the collected "Fables" by Jean de la Fontaine (Book I, No. 6). It was inspired by a fable by Phaedrus (Book I, No. 5). From this fable comes the French proverbial expression, “la part du lion,” and its English equivalent, the “lion's share.”

Suggested Citation

  • de la Fontaine Jean, 2012. "The Heifer, The Goat and The Sheep in Company with The Lion," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 1-5, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:aelcon:v:2:y:2012:i:2:n:1

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Langlois, Richard N., 2004. "Chandler in a Larger Frame: Markets, Transaction Costs, and Organizational Form in History," Enterprise & Society, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(03), pages 355-375, September.
    2. Strasser Kurt A. & Blumberg Phillip, 2011. "Legal Form and Economic Substance of Enterprise Groups: Implications for Legal Policy," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-30, January.
    3. Alchian, Armen A. & Demsetz, Harold, 1973. "The Property Right Paradigm," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 33(01), pages 16-27, March.
    4. Richard Arena, 2010. "Corporate limited liability and Cambridge economics in the inter-war period: Robertson, Keynes and Sraffa," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(5), pages 869-883.
    5. Michael Dietrich & Jackie Krafft, 2012. "The Economics and Theory of the Firm," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics and Theory of the Firm, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Henry Hansmann & Reinier Kraakman, 2000. "The End Of History For Corporate Law," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm136, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Feb 2001.
    7. Fama, Eugene F, 1980. "Agency Problems and the Theory of the Firm," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(2), pages 288-307, April.
    8. Hart, Oliver, 1995. "Firms, Contracts, and Financial Structure," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288817, June.
    9. E. Han Kim & Adair Morse & Luigi Zingales, 2006. "What Has Mattered to Economics Since 1970," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 189-202, Fall.
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