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Usury Versus Bank Credit


  • Petrascu Daniela

    (Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania)

  • Muresan Radu-Dan

    (Babes-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania)


Any individual, regardless of religion, social status, training or time of its existence in history was drawn like a magnet for money and power offered by them. The problem that is to be discussed briefly in the following pages has the purpose of obtaining money appealing to lenders or bankers. We do not intend to highlight the differences and similarities between the two precepts, trying to ignore the time factor, we present more a parallel between the two. An interesting parallel that highlights the origin of credit in times long forgotten, when the need of money urged you to knock at the usurer’s door.

Suggested Citation

  • Petrascu Daniela & Muresan Radu-Dan, 2011. "Usury Versus Bank Credit," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 6(3), pages 146-152, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:blg:journl:v:6:y:2011:i:3:p:146-152

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    lenders; bankers; credit;


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