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Financial Development, Growth Volatility and Information Asymmetry in Sub†Saharan Africa: Does Law Matter?

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  • Muazu Ibrahim
  • Paul Alagidede

Abstract

We re†examine the law–finance theory relying on 33 countries in sub†Saharan Africa over the period 2004–2011. Our evidence suggests that legal origin significantly explains cross†country differences in financial development and economic volatility. More importantly, relative to civil law, English common law countries and those in Southern Africa have higher financial sector development both in terms of financial activity and banking efficiency on the back of lower volatility. While private credit bureau positively (negatively) affects financial development (economic volatility) with economically large impact for English legal legacy countries, the latter effect is contingent on the form of legal origin suggesting that, the establishment of information sharing offices per se may be insufficient in taming growth vagaries.

Suggested Citation

  • Muazu Ibrahim & Paul Alagidede, 2017. "Financial Development, Growth Volatility and Information Asymmetry in Sub†Saharan Africa: Does Law Matter?," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(4), pages 570-588, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:85:y:2017:i:4:p:570-588
    DOI: 10.1111/saje.12176
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    Cited by:

    1. Ibrahim, Muazu & Alagidede, Paul, 2018. "Nonlinearities in financial development–economic growth nexus: Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 95-104.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2020. "The Mobile Phone, Information Sharing, and Financial Sector Development in Africa: a Quantile Regression Approach," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 11(3), pages 1234-1269, September.
    3. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Governance, capital flight and industrialisation in Africa," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 8(1), pages 1-22, December.
    4. Asongu, Simplice A & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2021. "Remittances and value added across economic sub-sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 27071, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    5. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Size, efficiency, market power, and economies of scale in the African banking sector," Financial Innovation, Springer;Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, vol. 5(1), pages 1-22, December.
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & Joseph Nnanna, 2020. "Governance and the capital flight trap in Africa," Transnational Corporations Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 276-292, July.
    7. Simplice A. Asongu & Joseph Nnanna & Paul N. Acha-Anyi, 2021. "The Openness Hypothesis in the Context of Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Moderating Role of Trade Dynamics on FDI," The International Trade Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 336-359, July.
    8. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2021. "Information Asymmetry and Insurance in Africa," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 394-410, July.
    9. Akisik, Orhan & Gal, Graham & Mangaliso, Mzamo P., 2020. "IFRS, FDI, economic growth and human development: The experience of Anglophone and Francophone African countries," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C).
    10. Asongu, Simplice A. & Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2020. "Foreign direct investment, information technology and economic growth dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1).
    11. Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2020. "Financial Access, Governance and the Persistence of Inequality in Africa: Mechanisms and Policy instruments," Working Papers 20/027, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    12. Ibrahim, Muazu & Alagidede, Paul, 2018. "Effect of financial development on economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1104-1125.
    13. Vanessa S. Tchamyou & Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "The Role of ICT in Modulating the Effect of Education and Lifelong Learning on Income Inequality and Economic Growth in Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 31(3), pages 261-274, September.
    14. Asongu, Simplice & Rahman, Mushfiqur & Nnanna, Joseph & Haffar, Mohamed, 2020. "Enhancing Information Technology for Value Added Across Economic Sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 107238, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2018. "Information asymmetry, financialization, and financial access," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(3), pages 297-315, December.
    16. Simplice A. Asongu & Christelle Meniago & Raufhon Salahodjaev, 2021. "The role of value added across economic sectors in modulating the effects of FDI on TFP and economic growth dynamics," Working Papers 21/088, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    17. Simplice A. Asongu, 2019. "Financial Access and Productivity Dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 19/052, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    18. Ibrahim, Muazu & Sare, Yakubu Awudu, 2018. "Determinants of financial development in Africa: How robust is the interactive effect of trade openness and human capital?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 18-26.
    19. Menyelim M. Chima & Abiola Ayopo Babajide & Alex Adegboye & Segun Kehinde & Oluwatobi Fasheyitan, 2021. "The Relevance of Financial Inclusion on Sustainable Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan African Nations," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(10), pages 1-20, May.
    20. Asongu, Simplice A. & Rahman, Mushfiqur & Nnanna, Joseph & Haffar, Mohamed, 2020. "Enhancing information technology for value added across economic sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa✰," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 161(C).
    21. Kong Yusheng & Jonas Bawuah & Agyeiwaa O. Nkwantabisa & Samuel O. O. Atuahene & George O. Djan, 2021. "Financial development and economic growth: Empirical evidence from Sub‐Saharan Africa," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 3396-3416, July.
    22. Yakubu Awudu Sare & Eric Evans Osei Opoku & Muazu Ibrahim & Isaac Koomson, 2019. "Financial sector development convergence in Africa: Evidence from bank- and market-based measures," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 8(4), pages 166-175.
    23. Yakubu Awudu Sare, 2021. "Threshold Effects of Financial Sector Development on International Trade in Africa," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(1), pages 515-541, January.
    24. Olufemi Adewale Aluko & Muazu Ibrahim, 2020. "On the macroeconomic determinants of financial institutions development in sub-Saharan Africa," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 67(1), pages 69-85, March.
    25. Ibrahim, Muazu, 2020. "Effects of trade and financial integration on structural transformation in Africa: New evidence from a sample splitting approach," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 556(C).

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