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The Ins And Outs Of Poverty In Advanced Economies: Government Policy And Poverty Dynamics In Canada, Germany, Great Britain, And The United States

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  • Robert G. Valletta

Abstract

Comparative analysis of poverty dynamics-transitions and persistence-can yield important insights about the nature of poverty and the effectiveness of alternative policy responses. This manuscript compares poverty dynamics in four advanced industrial countries (Canada, unified Germany, Great Britain, and the United States) for overlapping six-year periods in the 1990s, focusing on the impact of government policies. The data indicate that relative to measured cross-sectional poverty rates, poverty persistence is higher in North America than in Europe. Most poverty transitions, and the prevalence of chronic poverty, are associated with employment instability and family dissolution in all four countries. However, government tax-and-transfer policies are more effective at reducing poverty persistence in Europe than in North America. Copyright © 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation © International Association for Research in Income and Wealth 2006.

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  • Robert G. Valletta, 2006. "The Ins And Outs Of Poverty In Advanced Economies: Government Policy And Poverty Dynamics In Canada, Germany, Great Britain, And The United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 52(2), pages 261-284, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:52:y:2006:i:2:p:261-284
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    1. repec:hal:journl:hal-00393492 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Francesco Devicienti & Valentina Gualtieri, 2007. "The Dynamics and Persistence of Poverty: Evidence from Italy," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 63, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    3. Stephen P. Jenkins & John Micklewright, 2007. "New Directions in the Analysis of Inequality and Poverty," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 700, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Rolf Aaberge & Magne Mogstad, 2006. "On the Definition and Measurement of Chronic Poverty," ICER Working Papers 36-2006, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    5. Bruckmeier, Kerstin & Wiemers, Jürgen, 2011. "A new targeting - a new take-up? : non-take-up of social assistance in Germany after social policy reforms," IAB Discussion Paper 201110, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    6. Timm Bönke & Carsten Schröder, 2009. "The German spatial poverty divide: poorly endowed or bad luck?," Working Papers 118, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    7. Bönke Timm & Schröder Carsten, 2011. "Poverty in Germany – Statistical Inference and Decomposition," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 231(2), pages 178-209, April.
    8. Diana Worts & Amanda Sacker & Peggy McDonough, 2010. "Re-Assessing Poverty Dynamics and State Protections in Britain and the US: The Role of Measurement Error," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 97(3), pages 419-438, July.
    9. Daly, Mary C. & Valletta, Robert G., 2008. "Cross-national trends in earnings inequality and instability," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 215-219, May.
    10. Catherine Pollak & Bernard Gazier, 2009. "Que sait-on des trajectoires de pauvreté dans les pays riches ?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00393492, HAL.
    11. repec:hal:journl:hal-00393322 is not listed on IDEAS

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