IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/reesec/v31y2003i4p623-646.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Modeling Spatial Variation in Housing Prices: A Variable Interaction Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Timothy J. Fik
  • David C. Ling
  • Gordon F. Mulligan

Abstract

The absolute location of each real estate parcel in an urban housing market has a unique location-value signature. Accessibility indices, distant gradients and locational dummies cannot fully account for the influence of absolute location on the market price of housing because there are an indeterminable number of externalities (local and nonlocal) influencing a given property at a given location. Furthermore, the degree to which externalities affect real estate values is not only unique at each location but highly variable over space. Hence, absolute location must be viewed as interactive with other determinants of housing value. We present an interactive variables approach and test its ability to explain price variations in an urban residential housing market. The statistical evidence suggests that the value of location, as embodied in the selling price of housing units, may not be separable from other determinants of value. It is recommended that housing valuation models, therefore, be specified to allow site, structural and other independent attributes to interact with absolute location-{x, y} coordinates-when accounting for intraurban variation in the market price of residential housing. This approach is especially useful when estimating the value of housing for geographic areas where very little is known a priori about the neighborhoods or submarkets. Copyright 2003 by the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy J. Fik & David C. Ling & Gordon F. Mulligan, 2003. "Modeling Spatial Variation in Housing Prices: A Variable Interaction Approach," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 31(4), pages 623-646, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:31:y:2003:i:4:p:623-646
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1080-8620.2003.00079.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peek, Joe & Rosengren, Eric, 1995. "Bank regulation and the credit crunch," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3-4), pages 679-692, June.
    2. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 1994. "Bank Real Estate Lending and the New England Capital Crunch," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, pages 33-58.
    3. Frederick T. Furlong, 1992. "Capital regulation and bank lending," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 23-33.
    4. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 1995. "Banks and the availability of small business loans," Working Papers 95-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    5. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 1991. "The capital crunch: neither a borrower nor a lender be," Working Papers 91-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    6. Diana Hancock & James A. Wilcox, 1994. "Bank Capital and the Credit Crunch: The Roles of Risk-Weighted and Unweighted Capital Regulations," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 22(1), pages 59-94.
    7. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 1992. "The capital crunch in New England," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue May, pages 21-31.
    8. Jones, David S. & King, Kathleen Kuester, 1995. "The implementation of prompt corrective action: An assessment," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3-4), pages 491-510, June.
    9. Peek, Joe & Rosengren, Eric, 1995. "The Capital Crunch: Neither a Borrower nor a Lender Be," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(3), pages 625-638, August.
    10. D'Andrade, Kendall, 1992. "The End of an Era," Business Ethics Quarterly, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(03), pages 379-389, July.
    11. Diana Hancock & James A. Wilcox, 1992. "The effect on bank assets of business conditions and capital shortfalls," Proceedings 373, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Steven C. Bourassa & Eva Cantoni & Martin Hoesli, 2005. "Spatial Dependence, Housing Submarkets, and House Prices," FAME Research Paper Series rp151, International Center for Financial Asset Management and Engineering.
    2. José-María Montero-Lorenzo & Beatriz Larraz-Iribas, 2012. "Space-time approach to commercial property prices valuation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(28), pages 3705-3715, October.
    3. Wenjie Wu, 2012. "Spatial Variations in Amenity Values: New Evidence from Beijing, China," SERC Discussion Papers 0113, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    4. José-María Montero-Lorenzo & Beatriz Larraz-Iribas & Antonio Páez, 2009. "Estimating commercial property prices: an application of cokriging with housing prices as ancillary information," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, pages 407-425.
    5. Karolien De Bruyne & Jan Van Hove, 2013. "Explaining the spatial variation in housing prices: an economic geography approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(13), pages 1673-1689, May.
    6. Shibashis Mukherjee & Arthur Caplan, 2011. "GIS-based estimation of housing amenities: the case of high grounds and stagnant streams," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, pages 49-61.
    7. Christopher Bitter & Gordon Mulligan & Sandy Dall’erba, 2007. "Incorporating spatial variation in housing attribute prices: a comparison of geographically weighted regression and the spatial expansion method," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, pages 7-27.
    8. Darren Hayunga & R. Pace, 2010. "Spatial Statistics Applied to Commercial Real Estate," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 103-125, August.
    9. Ekaterina Chernobai & Michael Reibel & Michael Carney, 2011. "Nonlinear Spatial and Temporal Effects of Highway Construction on House Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 348-370, April.
    10. Gaaff, Aris & Reinhard, Stijn, 2012. "Incorporating the value of ecological networks into cost–benefit analysis to improve spatially explicit land-use planning," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 66-74.
    11. Ramya Aroul & J. Hansz, 2014. "The Valuation Impact on Distressed Residential Transactions: Anatomy of a Housing Price Bubble," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 277-302, August.
    12. Nora Ruth Libertun de Duren, 2017. "La carga de la vivienda de interés social: Comparación entre hogares de la periferia y del centro en ciudades de Brasil, Colombia y México," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8417, Inter-American Development Bank.
    13. Justin Ross & Michael Farmer & Clifford Lipscomb, 2011. "Inconsistency in Welfare Inferences from Distance Variables in Hedonic Regressions," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 385-400, October.
    14. Robert J. Hill & Michael Scholz, 2014. "Incorporating Geospatial Data in House Price Indexes: A Hedonic Imputation Approach with Splines," Graz Economics Papers 2014-05, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    15. João O. Borba & Tomaz Ponce Dentinho, 2016. "Evaluation of urban scenarios using bid-rents of spatial interaction models as hedonic price estimators: an application to the Terceira Island, Azores," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 671-685.
    16. David Ling & Milena Petrova, 2008. "Avoiding Taxes at Any Cost: The Economics of Tax-Deferred Real Estate Exchanges," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 367-404, May.
    17. Bhattacharjee, Arnab & Jensen-Butler, Chris, 2013. "Estimation of the spatial weights matrix under structural constraints," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 617-634.
    18. Steven Bourassa & Eva Cantoni & Martin Hoesli, 2007. "Spatial Dependence, Housing Submarkets, and House Price Prediction," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 143-160, August.
    19. Karolien De Bruyne & Jan Van Hove, "undated". "Explaining Spatial Variation in Housing Prices: An Economic Geography Approach," Regional and Urban Modeling 283600023, EcoMod.
    20. Wu, Wenjie, 2012. "Spatial variations in amenity values: new evidence from Beijing, China," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58536, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    21. Pavlyuk, Dmitry, 2009. "Statistical Analysis of the Relationship between Public Transport Accessibility and Flat Prices in Riga," MPRA Paper 20921, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:31:y:2003:i:4:p:623-646. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/areueea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.