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China's Floating Population: New Evidence from the 2000 Census

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  • Zai Liang
  • Zhongdong Ma

Abstract

This article uses tabulations from the 2000 Population Census of China along with a micro-level data sample from the census to provide a picture of China's floating population: migrants without local household registration ("hukou"), a status resulting in significant social and economic disadvantages. By 2000, the size of China's floating population had grown to nearly 79 million, if that category is defined as migrants who moved between provinces or counties and resided at their destinations for six months or more. Intra-county floating migration is similarly large, contributing another 66 million to the size of the floating population. The article also discusses the geographic pattern of the floating population and the reasons for moving as reported by migrants. Policy implications are noted. Copyright 2004 The Population Council, Inc..

Suggested Citation

  • Zai Liang & Zhongdong Ma, 2004. "China's Floating Population: New Evidence from the 2000 Census," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(3), pages 467-488.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:30:y:2004:i:3:p:467-488
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    Cited by:

    1. Schoolman, Ethan D. & Ma, Chunbo, 2012. "Migration, class and environmental inequality: Exposure to pollution in China's Jiangsu Province," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 140-151.
    2. Richard L. Forstall & Richard P. Greene & James B. Pick, 2009. "Which Are The Largest? Why Lists Of Major Urban Areas Vary So Greatly," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 100(3), pages 277-297, July.
    3. Mu, Ren & van de Walle, Dominique, 2011. "Left behind to farm? Women's labor re-allocation in rural China," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages 83-97.
    4. Feinian Chen & Hui Liu & Kriti Vikram & Yu Guo, 2015. "For Better or Worse: The Health Implications of Marriage Separation Due to Migration in Rural China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1321-1343, August.
    5. Lida Fan, 2009. "Measuring Interprovincial Flows of Human Capital in China: 1995–2000," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(3), pages 367-387, June.
    6. Deininger, Klaus & Jin, Songqing & Xia, Fang & Huang, Jikun, 2014. "Moving Off the Farm: Land Institutions to Facilitate Structural Transformation and Agricultural Productivity Growth in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 505-520.
    7. Song, Huasheng & Thisse, Jacques-François & Zhu, Xiwei, 2012. "Urbanization and/or rural industrialization in China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 126-134.
    8. Ren Mu & Alan Brauw, 2015. "Migration and young child nutrition: evidence from rural China," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(3), pages 631-657, July.
    9. Du, Yang & Park, Albert & Wang, Sangui, 2005. "Migration and rural poverty in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 688-709, December.
    10. Patrick S. Ward & Gerald E. Shively, 2015. "Migration and Land Rental as Responses to Income Shocks in Rural China," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(4), pages 511-543, October.
    11. Chang, Hongqin & Dong, Xiao-yuan & MacPhail, Fiona, 2011. "Labor Migration and Time Use Patterns of the Left-behind Children and Elderly in Rural China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2199-2210.
    12. Dean M. Hanink, 2010. "Perspectives on Regional Change: A Review Essay on "Handbook of Regional Growth and Development Theories"," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(1), pages 3-27.
    13. Ye Liu & Jianfa Shen, 2014. "Spatial patterns and determinants of skilled internal migration in China, 2000–2005," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(4), pages 749-771, November.
    14. repec:eee:chieco:v:47:y:2018:i:c:p:142-155 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Li, Cheng, 2010. "Savings, investment, and capital mobility within China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 14-23, March.
    16. Junichi Ito, 2008. "The removal of institutional impediments to migration and its impact on employment, production and income distribution in China," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 239-265, September.
    17. Chen, Juan, 2011. "Internal migration and health: Re-examining the healthy migrant phenomenon in China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(8), pages 1294-1301, April.
    18. Chen, Joyce J., 2013. "Identifying non-cooperative behavior among spouses: Child outcomes in migrant-sending households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(1), pages 1-18.

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