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The National Minimum Wage and Hours of Work: Implications for Low Paid Women

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  • Sara Connolly
  • Mary Gregory

Abstract

The largest group of beneficiaries from the introduction of the National Minimum Wage in the UK were women working part-time. A potential threat to these wage gains is a reduction in the working hours available, with part-time (flexible) jobs particularly vulnerable. This paper reports a range of difference-in-difference estimates using individual-level data from the New Earnings Survey and the British Household Panel Survey. No significant changes in hours worked by either full- or part-time women are found 1, 2 and 3 years after the NMW, and no change in the probabilities of remaining in full- or part-time work or transiting between the two. Copyright 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Sara Connolly & Mary Gregory, 2002. "The National Minimum Wage and Hours of Work: Implications for Low Paid Women," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 64(s1), pages 607-631, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:64:y:2002:i:s1:p:607-631
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    Cited by:

    1. Metcalf, David, 2007. "Why has the British national minimum wage had little or no impact on employment?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19742, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Seltzer, Andrew & Borland, Jeff, 2016. "The Impact of the 1896 Factory and Shops Act on Victorian Labour Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 10388, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Roy E. Bailey & Timothy J. Hatton & Kris Inwood, 2016. "Atmospheric Pollution and Child Health in Late Nineteenth Century Britain," CEH Discussion Papers 052, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. Mark B. Stewart & Joanna K. Swaffield, 2008. "The Other Margin: Do Minimum Wages Cause Working Hours Adjustments for Low-Wage Workers?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(297), pages 148-167, February.
    5. Bossler, Mario & Gerner, Hans-Dieter, 2016. "Employment effects of the new German minimum wage: Evidence from establishment-level micro data," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145926, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Dale L. Belman & Paul Wolfson, 2010. "The Effect of Legislated Minimum Wage Increases on Employment and Hours: A Dynamic Analysis," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(1), pages 1-25, March.
    7. Strobl, Eric & Walsh, Frank, 2007. "Dealing with monopsony power: Employment subsidies vs. minimum wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 83-89, January.
    8. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Iga Magda, 2015. "The impact of the minimum wage on job separations and working hours among young people in Poland," Working Papers 75, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    9. Stephen Morris & Rosalind Goudie & Matt Sutton & Hugh Gravelle & Robert Elliott & Arne Risa Hole & Ada Ma & Bonnie Sibbald & Diane Skåtun, 2011. "Determinants of general practitioners' wages in England," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 147-160, February.
    10. John Pencavel, 2016. "Whose Preferences Are Revealed In Hours Of Work?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 9-24, January.
    11. Riley, Rebecca & Rosazza Bondibene, Chiara, 2017. "Raising the standard: Minimum wages and firm productivity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 27-50.
    12. Francesconi, Marco & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2004. "The consequences of 'in-work' benefit reform in Britain: new evidence from panel data," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-13, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    13. Kato, Takao & Kodama, Naomi, 2014. "Labor Market Deregulation and Female Employment: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Japan," IZA Discussion Papers 8189, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. STROBL, Eric & WALSH, Frank, 2003. "Dealing with monopsony power: the case for using employment subsidies," CORE Discussion Papers 2003079, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    15. Rebecca Riley & Chiara Rosazza-Bondibene, 2015. "Raising the Standard: Minimum Wages and Firm Productivity," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 449, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    16. Bossler, Mario & Gerner, Hans-Dieter, 2016. "Employment effects of the new German minimum wage : evidence from establishment-level micro data," IAB Discussion Paper 201610, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    17. Strobl, Eric & Walsh, Frank, 2011. "The ambiguous effect of minimum wages on hours," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 218-228, April.
    18. Eric Strobl & Frank Walsh, 2010. "The minimum wage and hours per worker," Working Papers 201028, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    19. Eric Strobl & Frank Walsh, 2007. "The ambiguous effect of minimum wages on workers and total hours," Working Papers 200714, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

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