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Are There Differential Returns to Schooling by Gender? The Case of Indonesian Labour Markets

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  • Behrman, Jere R
  • Deolalikar, Anil B

Abstract

Women are thought to be disadvantaged in developing countries. One of the major respects in which they are conjectured to be disadvantaged is that labor-market rewards to their schooling are less than those for males. This study investigates whether there are gender differentials in Indonesian wage and earnings relations. The results indicate that, although the returns to work experience are greater for males than for females, the marginal rates of return to schooling beyond the primary level are significantly greater for females. Copyright 1995 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Behrman, Jere R & Deolalikar, Anil B, 1995. "Are There Differential Returns to Schooling by Gender? The Case of Indonesian Labour Markets," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 97-117, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:57:y:1995:i:1:p:97-117
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    Cited by:

    1. Kathryn Yount & John Maluccio & Jere Behrman & John Hoddinott & Alexis Murphy & Usha Ramakrishnan, 2013. "Parental Resources, Schooling Achievements, and Gender Schooling Gaps: Evidence of Change over 25 years in Rural Guatemala," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(4), pages 495-528, August.
    2. Jafarey, S. & Mainali, R. M. & Montes-Rojas, G., 2014. "The Anticipation Effect of Marriage on Female Education: Theory and Evidence from Nepal," Working Papers 15/12, Department of Economics, City University London.
    3. Abrar ul haq, Muhammad & Mehtab, Nadia & Khan, Tasneem, 2012. "Gender Disparity in Economic Returns to Higher Education: Evidence from Private Formal Sector of Bahawalpur (Pakistan)," MPRA Paper 62958, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2012.
    4. Estudillo, Jonna P. & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2001. "Income distribution in rice-growing villages during the post-Green Revolution periods: the Philippine case, 1985 and 1998," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), June.
    5. Abbas, Qaisar & Foreman-Peck, James, 2007. "The Mincer Human Capital Model in Pakistan: Implications for Education Policy," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2007/24, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    6. Echevarria, Cristina & Merlo, Antonio, 1999. "Gender Differences in Education in a Dynamic Household Bargaining Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(2), pages 265-286, May.
    7. Deon Filmer & David Lindauer, 2001. "Does Indonesia Have A 'Low Pay' Civil Service?," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 189-205.
    8. Jere R. Behrman, 1994. "Intra-family Distribution in Developing Countries," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 253-296.
    9. Dumauli, Magdalena Triasih, 2015. "Estimate of the private return on education in Indonesia: Evidence from sibling data," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 14-24.
    10. Jafarey, Saqib & Maiti, Dibyendu, 2015. "Glass slippers and glass ceilings: An analysis of marital anticipation and female education," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 45-61.
    11. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2001. "Land Inheritance and Schooling in Matrilineal Societies: Evidence from Sumatra," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(12), pages 2093-2110, December.
    12. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pb:p:2859-2939 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Monazza Aslam, 2006. "Rates of Return to Education by Gender in Pakistan," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-064, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    14. Aslam, Monazza & Kingdon, Geeta, 2009. "Public-private sector segmentation in the Pakistani labour market," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 34-49, January.
    15. Dendir, Seife, 2013. "Children's Endowment, Schooling, and Work in Ethiopia," WIDER Working Paper Series 086, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. Mansuri, Ghazala, 2006. "Migration, school attainment, and child labor : evidence from rural Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3945, The World Bank.
    17. Alderman, Harold & King, Elizabeth M., 1998. "Gender differences in parental investment in education," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 453-468, December.
    18. Thomas, Duncan & Beegle, Kathleen & Frankenberg, Elizabeth & Sikoki, Bondan & Strauss, John & Teruel, Graciela, 2004. "Education in a crisis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 53-85, June.
    19. Maria Arrazola & Jose de Hevia, 2006. "Gender Differentials in Returns to Education in Spain," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 469-486.
    20. Agrawal, Nisha, 1996. "The benefits of growth for Indonesian Workers," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1637, The World Bank.
    21. Dendir, Seife, 2014. "Children's cognitive ability, schooling and work: Evidence from Ethiopia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 22-36.

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