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Can Micro Health Insurance Reduce Poverty? Evidence From Bangladesh

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  • Syed Abdul Hamid
  • Jennifer Roberts
  • Paul Mosley

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of micro health insurance on poverty reduction in rural areas of Bangladesh. The research is based on household level primary data collected from the operating areas of the Grameen Bank during 2006. A number of outcome measures relating to poverty status are considered; these include household income, stability of household income via food sufficiency and ownership of non-land assets, and also the probability of being above or below the poverty line. The results show that micro health insurance has a positive association with all of these indicators, and this is statistically significant and quantitatively important for food sufficiency.
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Suggested Citation

  • Syed Abdul Hamid & Jennifer Roberts & Paul Mosley, 2011. "Can Micro Health Insurance Reduce Poverty? Evidence From Bangladesh," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 78(1), pages 57-82, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jrinsu:v:78:y:2011:i:1:p:57-82
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    1. repec:pdc:jrnbeh:v:13:y:2017:i:2:p:182-191 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mebratie, A.D. & Sparrow, R.A. & Alemu, G. & Bedi, A.S., 2013. "Community-Based Health Insurance Schemes," ISS Working Papers - General Series 568, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    3. Bendig, Mirko & Arun, Thankom Gopinath, 2011. "Enrolment in Micro Life and Health Insurance: Evidences from Sri Lanka," IZA Discussion Papers 5427, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Geng, Xin & Ide, Vera & Janssens, Wendy & Kramer, Berber & van der List, Marijn, 2017. "Health insurance, a friend in need? Evidence from financial and health diaries in Kenya," IFPRI discussion papers 1664, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Lawrence Sáez, 2013. "Methods in governance research: a review of research approaches," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-017-13, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    6. Shigute, Zemzem & Mebratie, Anagaw D. & Sparrow, Robert & Yilma, Zelalem & Alemu, Getnet & Bedi, Arjun S., 2017. "Uptake of health insurance and the productive safety net program in rural Ethiopia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 133-141.
    7. Shigute, Zemzem & Strupat, Christoph & Burchi, Francesco & Alemu, Getnet & Bedi, Arjun S., 2017. "The Joint Effects of a Health Insurance and a Public Works Scheme in Rural Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 10939, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. S. Savitha & K. Kiran, 2015. "Effectiveness of micro health insurance on financial protection: Evidence from India," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 53-71, March.
    9. Aradhna Aggarwal, 2010. "Impact evaluation of India's ‘Yeshasvini’ community‐based health insurance programme," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 5-35, September.
    10. Ahsan, Syed M & Mahmud, Minhaj, 2011. "Microinsurance: The Choice among Delivery and Regulatory Mechanisms," MPRA Paper 50286, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jul 2013.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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