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Information, Trading, and Volatility: Evidence from Weather-Sensitive Markets

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  • JEFF FLEMING
  • CHRIS KIRBY
  • BARBARA OSTDIEK

Abstract

We find that trading- versus nontrading-period variance ratios in weather-sensitive markets are lower than those in the equity market and higher than those in the currency market. The variance ratios are also substantially lower during periods of the year when prices are most sensitive to the weather. Moreover, the comovement of returns and volatilities for related commodities is stronger during the weather-sensitive season, largely due to stronger comovement during nontrading periods. These results are consistent with a strong link between prices and public information flow and cannot be explained by pricing errors or changes in trading activity. Copyright 2006 by The American Finance Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeff Fleming & Chris Kirby & Barbara Ostdiek, 2006. "Information, Trading, and Volatility: Evidence from Weather-Sensitive Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(6), pages 2899-2930, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfinan:v:61:y:2006:i:6:p:2899-2930
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    Cited by:

    1. Isengildina-Massa, Olga & Irwin, Scott H. & Good, Darrel L. & Gomez, Jennifer K., 2008. "The Impact of Situation and Outlook Information in Corn and Soybean Futures Markets: Evidence from WASDE Reports," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 40(01), pages 89-103, April.
    2. Gutierrez, Jose A. & Martinez, Valeria & Tse, Yiuman, 2009. "Where does return and volatility come from? The case of Asian ETFs," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 671-679, October.
    3. repec:eee:jfinec:v:127:y:2018:i:2:p:342-365 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Wang, Junbo & Wu, Chunchi, 2015. "Liquidity, credit quality, and the relation between volatility and trading activity: Evidence from the corporate bond market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 183-203.
    5. Yiuman Tse & Jose A. Gutierrez, 2009. "Where does Volatility and Return Come From? The Case of Asian ETFs," Working Papers 0063, College of Business, University of Texas at San Antonio.
    6. Mu, Xiaoyi, 2007. "Weather, storage, and natural gas price dynamics: Fundamentals and volatility," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 46-63, January.
    7. Yiuman Tse & Brian C. McTier & John K. Wald, 2011. "Do Stock Markets Catch the Flu? We examine the impact of influenza on the U.S. stock market. A higher incidence of flu is associated with decreased trading, decreased volatility, and higher bid-ask sp," Working Papers 0004, College of Business, University of Texas at San Antonio.
    8. Shalini, Velappan & Prasanna, Krishna, 2016. "Impact of the financial crisis on Indian commodity markets: Structural breaks and volatility dynamics," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 40-57.
    9. Qin Wang & Hsiao-Fen Yang, 2015. "Earnings announcements, trading volume, and price discovery: evidence from dual class firms," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 44(4), pages 669-700, May.
    10. Yiuman Tse & Brian C. McTier & John K. Wald, 2011. "Do Stock Markets Catch the Flu? We examine the impact of influenza on the U.S. stock market. A higher incidence of flu is associated with decreased trading, decreased volatility, and higher bid-ask sp," Working Papers 0004, College of Business, University of Texas at San Antonio.
    11. Ron Balvers & Ding Du & Xiaobing Zhao, 2009. "What Do Financial Markets Reveal about Global Warming?," Working Papers 09-04, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    12. Jin, Na, 2011. "Three essays on commodity futures and options markets," ISU General Staff Papers 201101010800001428, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    13. Hsin, Chin-Wen & Tseng, Po-Wen, 2012. "Stock price synchronicities and speculative trading in emerging markets," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 82-109.
    14. Balvers, Ronald & Du, Ding & Zhao, Xiaobing, 2017. "Temperature shocks and the cost of equity capital: Implications for climate change perceptions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 18-34.
    15. Batten, Jonathan A. & Ciner, Cetin & Lucey, Brian M., 2010. "The macroeconomic determinants of volatility in precious metals markets," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 65-71, June.
    16. Fung, Hung-Gay & Tse, Yiuman & Yau, Jot & Zhao, Lin, 2013. "A leader of the world commodity futures markets in the making? The case of China's commodity futures," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 103-114.
    17. Vicente Medina Martínez & Ángel Pardo Tornero, 2012. "Stylized facts of CO2 returns," Working Papers. Serie AD 2012-14, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    18. Balvers, Ronald & Du, Ding & Zhao, Xiaobing, 2012. "The Adverse Impact of Gradual Temperature Change on Capital Investment," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124676, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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