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Relationship Lending During A Financial Crisis

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  • Enrico Sette
  • Giorgio Gobbi

Abstract

This paper studies whether relationship lending mitigates the transmission of the Lehman default shock to the supply of credit in Italy. Exploiting the presence of multiple banking relationships, we control for banks' and firms' unobserved characteristics. Results show that the growth of credit itself is higher and its cost lower the shorter the distance between the bank and the firm, the longer the relationship, and the higher the share of credit held by the bank. Credit growth by relationship lenders is 4.6% higher than that by transactional lenders; the increase in the cost of credit is 50 basis points lower. The positive effect of relationship lending on credit supply increased during the crisis, compared to a pre-crisis period. The beneficial effect of relationship lending is weaker if the relationship lender is more exposed to the financial crisis, especially when lending to weaker borrowers.

Suggested Citation

  • Enrico Sette & Giorgio Gobbi, 2015. "Relationship Lending During A Financial Crisis," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 453-481, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jeurec:v:13:y:2015:i:3:p:453-481
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jeea.12111
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Bripi & David Loschiavo & Davide Revelli, 2017. "Services trade and credit frictions: evidence from matched bank-firm data," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1110, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Pietro Alessandrini & Michele Fratianni & Luca Papi & Alberto Zazzaro, 2016. "Banks, Regions and Development After the Crisis and Under the New Regulatory System," Credit and Capital Markets, Credit and Capital Markets, vol. 49(4), pages 535-561.
    3. Ryan Banerjee & Enrico Sette & Leonardo Gambacorta, 2017. "The real effects of relationship lending," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1133, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Leonardo Gambacorta & Giacomo Ricotti & Suresh Sundaresan & Zhenyu Wang, 2017. "The effects of tax on bank liability structure," BIS Working Papers 611, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Jon Cohen & Kinda Cheryl Hachem & Gary Richardson, 2016. "Relationship Lending and the Great Depression: New Measurement and Implications," NBER Working Papers 22891, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Dwenger, Nadja & Dr. Fossen, Frank & Dr. Simmler, Martin, 2015. "From financial to real economic crisis. Evidence from individual firm-bank relationships in Germany," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113000, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Nadja Dwenger & Frank M Fossen & Martin Simmler, 2015. "From financial to real economic crisis: evidence from individual firm¨Cbank relationships in Germany," Working Papers 1516, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
    8. Teruyoshi Kobayashi & Taro Takaguchi, 2017. "Significant ties: Identifying relationship lending in temporal interbank networks," Discussion Papers 1717, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    9. Bonaccorsi di Patti, Emilia & Sette, Enrico, 2016. "Did the securitization market freeze affect bank lending during the financial crisis? Evidence from a credit register," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 54-76.
    10. Brand, Thomas & Isoré, Marlène & Tripier, Fabien, 2017. "Uncertainty Shocks and Firm Dynamics: Search and Monitoring in the Credit Market," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1707, CEPREMAP.
    11. Giovanni Ferri & Pierluigi Murro, 2016. "A Credit Crunch Behind the Great Trade Collapse? Micro Evidence From Europe," CERBE Working Papers wpC10, CERBE Center for Relationship Banking and Economics.
    12. C. Cahn & A. Duquerroy & W. Mullins, 2017. "Unconventional Monetary Policy and Bank Lending Relationships," Working papers 659, Banque de France.
    13. Carroll, James & McCann, Fergal, 2017. "Observables and residuals: exploring cross-border differences in Small and Medium Enterprise borrowing costs," Research Technical Papers 02/RT/17, Central Bank of Ireland.
    14. Giovanni Ferri & Raoul Minetti & Pierluigi Murro, 2018. "Credit Relationships in the Great Trade Collapse. Micro Evidence From Europe," CERBE Working Papers wpC26, CERBE Center for Relationship Banking and Economics.
    15. Leonardo Gambacorta & Hyun Song Shin, 2016. "Why bank capital matters for monetary policy," BIS Working Papers 558, Bank for International Settlements.
    16. Beck, Thorsten & Da-Rocha-Lopes, Samuel & Silva, Andre, 2017. "Sharing the Pain? Credit Supply and Real Effects of Bank Bail-ins," CEPR Discussion Papers 12058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Pietro Alessandrini & Michele Fratianni & Luca Papi & Alberto Zazzaro, 2016. "The asymmetric burden of regulation: will local banks survive?," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 125, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    18. Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2018. "Credit supply and productivity growth," BIS Working Papers 711, Bank for International Settlements.
    19. Sotirios Kokas & Dmitri Vinogradov & Marios Zachariadis, 2018. "Which Banks Smooth and at What Price?," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 01-2018, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    20. Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2018. "Credit supply and productivity growth," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1168, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

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