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The Empirical Measurement Of Rent‐Seeking Costs

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  • Ignacio Del Rosal

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  • Ignacio Del Rosal, 2011. "The Empirical Measurement Of Rent‐Seeking Costs," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(2), pages 298-325, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:25:y:2011:i:2:p:298-325
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Leppälä, Samuli, 2018. "Partial Exclusivity Can Resolve The Empirical Puzzles Associated With Rent-Seeking Activities," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2018/25, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    2. Arye L. Hillman & Ngo Van Long, 2017. "Rent Seeking: The Social Cost of Contestable Benefits," CESifo Working Paper Series 6462, CESifo.
    3. Amihai Glazer & Stef Proost, 2020. "Benefits to the majority from universal service," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 27(2), pages 391-408, April.
    4. Graham Brownlow, 2015. "Back to the failure: an analytic narrative of the De Lorean debacle," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 57(1), pages 156-181, January.
    5. Martin Gregor, 2016. "Tullock's Puzzle in Pay-and-Play Lobbying," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 368-389, November.
    6. Richard Carson, 0. "Inclusiveness, Growth, and Political Support," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 0, pages 1-19.
    7. Patrick A. McLaughlin & Adam C. Smith & Russell S. Sobel, 2019. "Bootleggers, Baptists, and the risks of rent seeking," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 211-234, June.
    8. David N. Laband & John P. Sophocleus, 2019. "Measuring rent-seeking," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 181(1), pages 49-69, October.
    9. Arye L. Hillman & Heinrich W. Ursprung, 2016. "Where are the rent seekers?," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 124-141, June.
    10. Roman M. Sheremeta, 2016. "Impulsive Behavior in Competition: Testing Theories of Overbidding in Rent-Seeking Contests," Working Papers 16-21, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    11. Toke S. Aidt, 2016. "Rent seeking and the economics of corruption," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 142-157, June.
    12. Joshua Hall & Josh Matti & Amir B. Ferreira Neto, 2019. "Rent-seeking in the classroom and textbooks: Where are we after 50 years?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 181(1), pages 71-82, October.
    13. Cameron K Murray, 2014. "Resolving rent-seeking puzzles: A model of political influence via social signals," Discussion Papers Series 528, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    14. Iqbal, Nasir & Daly, Vince, 2014. "Rent seeking opportunities and economic growth in transitional economies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 16-22.
    15. Richard Carson, 2020. "The ‘Welfare Loss from Monopoly’ Re-visited," Carleton Economic Papers 20-13, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2021.
    16. Farla, Kristine & de Crombrugghe, Denis & Verspagen, Bart, 2016. "Institutions, Foreign Direct Investment, and Domestic Investment: Crowding Out or Crowding In?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 1-9.
    17. Leppälä, Samuli, 2021. "A partially exclusive rent-seeking contest," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 60-75.
    18. Anderson, Lisa R. & Freeborn, Beth A., 2020. "A Rent Seeking Experiment with Leakage from the Contest Success Function," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 87(C).
    19. Richard Carson, 2020. "Inclusiveness, Growth, and Political Support," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 46(4), pages 557-575, October.
    20. Richard L. Carson, 2009. "The Effect of Rent Seeking on Economics Growth," Carleton Economic Papers 09-10, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 19 Dec 2016.
    21. Arye Hillman & Ngo Van Long, 2017. "The social cost of contestable benefits," CIRANO Working Papers 2017s-11, CIRANO.
    22. Richard L. Carson, 2009. "Rent Seeking and Inclusiveness," Carleton Economic Papers 09-05, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 19 Dec 2016.
    23. Leonardo Baggiani & Enrico Colombatto, 2017. "Feasible taxation in advanced democracies," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 64(3), pages 213-229, September.
    24. Schnellenbach, Jan, 2021. "The concept of Ordnungspolitik: Rule-based economic policy-making from the perspective of the Freiburg School," Freiburg Discussion Papers on Constitutional Economics 21/07, Walter Eucken Institut e.V..
    25. Cheshire, Paul & Dericks, Gerard, 2020. "Trophy architects and design as rent-seeking: quantifying deadweight losses in a tightly regulated office market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103134, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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