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Fragmentation and Sprawl: Evidence from Interregional Analysis

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  • John I. Carruthers

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed widespread expansion of state and regional planning programs in the United States. A major purpose of these efforts is to reduce urban sprawl-low density, discontinuous, suburban-style development, often characterized as the result of rapid, unplanned, and/or uncoordinated growth- by promoting jurisdictional cooperation and regulatory consistency across metropolitan areas. This paper evaluates the efficacy of this approach by examining the relationship between governmental fragmentation and several measurable outcomes of urban development: density, urbanized land area, property value, and public expenditures on infrastructure. The four dimensions are modeled in a simultaneous equations framework, providing substantive evidence on how fragmentation and other exogenous factors affect metropolitan growth patterns. Fragmentation is associated with lower densities and higher property values, but has no direct effect on public service expenditures; less fragmented metropolitan areas occupy greater amounts of land due to the extensive annexation needed to bring new development under the control of a central municipality. The findings of the analysis lend support to state and regional planning efforts aimed at increasing cooperation among local governments, but also suggest that further research is needed in order to evaluate whether or not they produce their intended effects. Copyright 2002 Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky.

Suggested Citation

  • John I. Carruthers, 2002. "Fragmentation and Sprawl: Evidence from Interregional Analysis," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(3), pages 312-340.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:33:y:2002:i:3:p:312-340
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Miriam Hortas-Rico & Albert Solé-Ollé, 2010. "Does Urban Sprawl Increase the Costs of Providing Local Public Services? Evidence from Spanish Municipalities," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(7), pages 1513-1540, June.
    2. Jae Kim & Geoffrey Hewings, 2013. "Land use regulation and intraregional population–employment interaction," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(3), pages 671-693, December.
    3. Albert Solé-Ollé & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2007. "Economic and political determinants of urban expansion: Exploring the local connection," Working Papers 2007/5, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    4. Miriam Hortas-Rico, 2014. "Urban sprawl and municipal budgets in Spain: A dynamic panel data analysis," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(4), pages 843-864, November.
    5. Licia Ferranna & Margherita Gerolimetto & Stefano Magrini, 2016. "Urban Governance Structure and Wage Disparities across US Metropolitan Areas," Working Papers 2016:26, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    6. Miriam Hortas-Rico, 2015. "Sprawl, Blight, And The Role Of Urban Containment Policies: Evidence From U.S. Cities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 298-323, March.
    7. Grassmueck, Georg & Goetz, Stephan J. & Shields, Martin, 2008. "Youth Out-Migration from Pennsylvania: The Roles of Government Fragmentation vs. the Beaten Path Effect," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 38(1).
    8. Joshua Duke & Lori Lynch, 2007. "Gauging support for innovative farmland preservation techniques," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 40(2), pages 123-155, June.
    9. Vojnovic, Igor & Darden, Joe T., 2013. "Class/racial conflict, intolerance, and distortions in urban form: Lessons for sustainability from the Detroit region," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 88-98.
    10. repec:spr:endesu:v:19:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10668-015-9742-y is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:bla:growch:v:47:y:2016:i:4:p:664-681 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. John I. Carruthers, 2012. "Land use regulation and regional form: a spatial mismatch?," Chapters,in: Networks, Space and Competitiveness, chapter 8, pages 181-204 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Delattre, Laurence & Chanel, Olivier & Livenais, Cecile & Napoléone, Claude, 2015. "Combining discourse analyses to enrich theory: The case of local land-use policies in South Eastern France," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 60-75.
    14. Andrew Aurand, 2013. "Does Sprawl Induce Affordable Housing?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(4), pages 631-649, December.

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