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The Halloween Effect in U.S. Sectors

Author

Listed:
  • Ben Jacobsen
  • Nuttawat Visaltanachoti

Abstract

U.S. stock market sectors and industries perform better during winter than summer from 1926 to 2006. In more than two-thirds of sectors and industries, the difference in summer and winter returns, known as the Halloween effect, is statistically significant. There are, however, large differences across sectors and industries. The effect is almost absent in sectors related to consumer consumption but is strong in production sectors. We find that neither liquidity changes nor well-known risk factors can explain the anomaly. We illustrate how the differences between sectors and industries can improve the risk-return tradeoff using sector rotation. Copyright (c) 2009, The Eastern Finance Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Ben Jacobsen & Nuttawat Visaltanachoti, 2009. "The Halloween Effect in U.S. Sectors," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 44(3), pages 437-459, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:finrev:v:44:y:2009:i:3:p:437-459
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefanescu, Razvan & Dumitriu, Ramona & Nistor, Costel, 2012. "Prolonged holiday effects on Romanian capital market before and after the adhesion to EU," MPRA Paper 52770, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jan 2013.
    2. Dichtl, Hubert & Drobetz, Wolfgang, 2015. "Sell in May and Go Away: Still good advice for investors?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 29-43.
    3. Haggard, K. Stephen & Witte, H. Douglas, 2010. "The Halloween effect: Trick or treat?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 379-387, December.
    4. Beladi, Hamid & Chao, Chi Chur & Hu, May, 2016. "The Christmas effect—Special dividend announcements," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 15-30.
    5. Haibin Xie & Qilin Qin & Shouyang Wang, 2016. "Is Halloween Effect a New Puzzle? Evidence from Price Gap," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 6, pages 19-31, November.
    6. repec:eee:ecofin:v:43:y:2018:i:c:p:169-205 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Mehmet Akbulut & Su Han Chan & Mariya Letdin, 2015. "Calendar Anomalies: Do REITs Behave Like Stocks?," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 18(2), pages 177-215.
    8. Dragos Stefan Oprea, 2014. "The Halloween Effect Evidence from Romania," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 4(7), pages 463-471, July.
    9. Guo, Biao & Luo, Xingguo & Zhang, Ziding, 2014. "Sell in May and Go Away: Evidence from China," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 362-368.
    10. repec:kap:jrefec:v:56:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11146-016-9564-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Dichtl, Hubert & Drobetz, Wolfgang, 2014. "Are stock markets really so inefficient? The case of the “Halloween Indicator”," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 112-121.
    12. Wadim Strielkowski, 2014. "Business Potential of Halloween: Sales and Trends," Tržište/Market, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb, vol. 26(2), pages 215-225.

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