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Why the industrial revolution was British: commerce, induced invention, and the scientific revolution

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  • R. C. ALLEN

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  • R. C. Allen, 2011. "Why the industrial revolution was British: commerce, induced invention, and the scientific revolution," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(2), pages 357-384, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:64:y:2011:i:2:p:357-384
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bottomley, Sean, 2014. "Patenting in England, Scotland and Ireland during the Industrial Revolution, 1700-1852," IAST Working Papers 14-07, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST).
    2. Tommaso Ciarli & Valentina Meliciani & Maria Savona, 2012. "Knowledge Dynamics, Structural Change And The Geography Of Business Services," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 445-467, July.
    3. Cizakca, Murat, 2012. "Finance and economic development in Islam, historical perspective," MPRA Paper 42046, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Bruland, Kristine & Smith, Keith, 2013. "Assessing the role of steam power in the first industrial revolution: The early work of Nick von Tunzelmann," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(10), pages 1716-1723.
    5. Guido Alfani & Wouter Ryckbosch, 2015. "Was there a ‘Little Convergence’ in inequality? Italy and the Low Countries compared, ca. 1500-1800," Working Papers 557, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    6. repec:zbw:espost:157805 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2015. "Just add milk: a productivity analysis of the revolutionary changes in nineteenth-century Danish dairying," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(4), pages 1132-1153, November.
    8. Ackah, Ishmael, 2015. "On the relationship between energy consumption, productivity and economic growth: Evidence from Algeria, Ghana, Nigeria and South Africa," MPRA Paper 64887, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Theo C.M.J. van de Klundert, 2013. "Capitalism and Democracy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15248, April.
    10. Jane Humphries, 2013. "The lure of aggregates and the pitfalls of the patriarchal perspective: a critique of the high wage economy interpretation of the British industrial revolution," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(3), pages 693-714, August.
    11. Sangjun Jeong, 2017. "Biased Technical Change and Economic Growth: The Case of Korea, 1970–2013," Research in Political Economy,in: Return of Marxian Macro-Dynamics in East Asia, volume 32, pages 81-103 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    12. Di Muzio, Tim & Dow, Matthew, 2016. "Uneven and Combined Confusion: On the Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism and the Rise of the West," Working Papers on Capital as Power 2016/03, Capital As Power - Toward a New Cosmology of Capitalism.

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