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International Migration and Growth in Developed Countries: A Theoretical Analysis

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  • Lundborg, Per
  • Segerstrom, Paul S

Abstract

We use a two-country version of the quality ladders endogenous growth model and show that free international migration raises world growth if it is driven by imbalances in labour supplies. International migration may, however, lower growth if it is induced by policy differences across, countries. Moreover, other things being equal, workers want to migrate to less populated countries, to countries that subsidize R&D less, to countries with lower tariffs, and to countries with wealthier consumers. Neither structural nor public policy differences generate any differences in growth rates across countries when tariffs are set at non-prohibitively high levels. Copyright 2000 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

Suggested Citation

  • Lundborg, Per & Segerstrom, Paul S, 2000. "International Migration and Growth in Developed Countries: A Theoretical Analysis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(268), pages 579-604, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:67:y:2000:i:268:p:579-604
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    Cited by:

    1. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Document de Recherche du Laboratoire d'Économie d'Orléans "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986- 2006"
      [Document de Recherche du Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orléans &qu
      ," Working Papers halshs-01252165, HAL.
    2. Stephen Drinkwater & Paul Levine & Emanuela Lotti & Joseph Pearlman, 2007. "The Immigration Surplus Revisited In A General Equilibrium Model With Endogenous Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 569-601.
    3. Clemente, Jesus & Pueyo, Fernando & Sanz, Fernando, 2008. "A migration model with congestion costs: Does the size of government matter," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 300-311, March.
    4. Etzo, Ivan, 2008. "Internal migration and growth in Italy," MPRA Paper 8642, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Etzo, Ivan, 2008. "Internal migration: a review of the literature," MPRA Paper 8783, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:leo:wpaper:2235 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Giam Cipriani, 2006. "Endogenous fertility, international migration and growth," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 53(1), pages 49-67, March.
    8. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986–2006," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 340-360.
    9. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    10. Isaac Ehrlich & Jinyoung Kim, 2015. "Immigration, Human Capital Formation, and Endogenous Economic Growth," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(4), pages 518-563.
    11. Mondal, Debasis & Gupta, Manash Ranjan, 2008. "Innovation, imitation and intellectual property rights: Introducing migration in Helpman's model," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 369-394, August.
    12. Stephen Drinkwater & Paul Levine & Emanuela Lotti & Joseph Pearlman, 2003. "The Economic Impact of Migration: A Survey," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0103, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    13. Paul Levine & Emanuela Lotti & Joseph Pearlman & Richard Pierse, 2010. "Growth And Welfare Effects Of World Migration," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 57(5), pages 615-643, November.
    14. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Document de Recherche du Laboratoire d'Économie d'Orléans "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986- 2006"
      [Document de Recherche du Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orléans &qu
      ," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01252165, HAL.

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