IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/coecpo/v29y2011i4p580-592.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Inverse Relationship Between Productivity And Farm Size: The Case Of China

Author

Listed:
  • ZHUO CHEN
  • WALLACE E. HUFFMAN
  • SCOTT ROZELLE

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhuo Chen & Wallace E. Huffman & Scott Rozelle, 2011. "Inverse Relationship Between Productivity And Farm Size: The Case Of China," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(4), pages 580-592, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:29:y:2011:i:4:p:580-592
    DOI: j.1465-7287.2010.00236.x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2010.00236.x
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Francisco Campos-Ortiz & Mariana Oviedo-Pacheco, 2013. "Study on the Competitiveness of the Mexican Sugar Industry," Working Papers 2013-16, Banco de México.
    2. repec:eee:agisys:v:153:y:2017:i:c:p:181-189 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. von Braun, Joachim & Mirzabaev, Alisher, 2015. "Small Farms: Changing Structures and Roles in Economic Development," Discussion Papers 210464, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    4. Desiere, Sam & Jolliffe, Dean, 2018. "Land productivity and plot size: Is measurement error driving the inverse relationship?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 84-98.
    5. Wanglin Ma & Awudu Abdulai, 2016. "Linking apple farmers to markets: Determinants and impacts of marketing contracts in China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 2-21, February.
    6. Rada, Nicholas & Wang, Chenggang & Qin, Lijian, 2015. "Subsidy or market reform? Rethinking China’s farm consolidation strategy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 93-103.
    7. Daniel Ayalew Ali & Klaus Deininger, 2015. "Is There a Farm Size–Productivity Relationship in African Agriculture? Evidence from Rwanda," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 91(2), pages 317-343.
    8. Mansoor Maitah & Ahmed Murjan & Helena Rezbová & Mustofa Jehar, 2016. "Economic Analysis of Olive Oil Production Costs as Influenced by Farm Size in Syrian Coastal Region," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(1), pages 154-162.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:29:y:2011:i:4:p:580-592. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/weaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.