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Pooling in Dynamic Panel-Data Models: An Application to Forecasting GDP Growth Rates

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  • Hoogstrate, Andre J
  • Palm, Franz C
  • Pfann, Gerard A

Abstract

In this article, we analyze issues of pooling models for a given set of N individual units observed over T periods of time. When the parameters of the models are different but exhibit some similarity, pooling may lead to a reduction of the mean squared error of the estimates and forecasts. We investigate theoretically and through simulations the conditions that lead to improved performance of forecasts based on pooled estimates. We show that the superiority of pooled forecasts in small samples can deteriorate as the sample size grows. Empirical results for postwar international real gross domestic product growth rates of 18 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries using a model put forward by Garcia-Ferrer, Highfield, Palm, and Zellner and Hong, among others illustrate these findings. When allowing for contemporaneous residual correlation across countries, pooling restrictions and criteria have to be rejected when formally tested, but generalized least squares (GLS)-based pooled forecasts are found to outperform GLS-based individual and ordinary least squares-based pooled and individual forecasts.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoogstrate, Andre J & Palm, Franz C & Pfann, Gerard A, 2000. "Pooling in Dynamic Panel-Data Models: An Application to Forecasting GDP Growth Rates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 18(3), pages 274-283, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bes:jnlbes:v:18:y:2000:i:3:p:274-83
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    Cited by:

    1. Hendry, David F. & Clements, Michael P., 2003. "Economic forecasting: some lessons from recent research," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 301-329, March.
    2. Baltagi, Badi H. & Bresson, Georges & Pirotte, Alain, 2012. "Forecasting with spatial panel data," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 56(11), pages 3381-3397.
    3. Baltagi, Badi H., 2013. "Panel Data Forecasting," Handbook of Economic Forecasting, Elsevier.
    4. Atak, Alev & Linton, Oliver & Xiao, Zhijie, 2011. "A semiparametric panel model for unbalanced data with application to climate change in the United Kingdom," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 164(1), pages 92-115, September.
    5. Issler, João Victor & Lima, Luiz Renato, 2009. "A panel data approach to economic forecasting: The bias-corrected average forecast," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 152(2), pages 153-164, October.
    6. Badi H. Baltagi, 2008. "Forecasting with panel data," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 153-173.
    7. Longhi, Simonetta & Nijkamp, Peter, 2006. "Forecasting regional labor market developments under spatial heterogeneity and spatial correlation," Serie Research Memoranda 0015, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    8. Sylvia Kaufmann, 2003. "The business cycle of European countries Bayesian clustering of country - individual IP growth series," Working Papers 83, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    9. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp, 2005. "Forecasting Regional Labour Market Developments Under Spatial Heterogeneity and Spatial Autocorrelation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-041/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. Galvao Jr., Antonio F., 2011. "Quantile regression for dynamic panel data with fixed effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 164(1), pages 142-157, September.
    11. Sylvia Kaufmann, 2010. "Dating and forecasting turning points by Bayesian clustering with dynamic structure: a suggestion with an application to Austrian data," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(2), pages 309-344.
    12. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp, 2007. "Forecasting Regional Labor Market Developments under Spatial Autocorrelation," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 30(2), pages 100-119, April.
    13. repec:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1247-0 is not listed on IDEAS

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