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Much Ado About Nothing: A Comparison of Missing Data Methods and Software to Fit Incomplete Data Regression Models

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  • Horton, Nicholas J.
  • Kleinman, Ken P.

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  • Horton, Nicholas J. & Kleinman, Ken P., 2007. "Much Ado About Nothing: A Comparison of Missing Data Methods and Software to Fit Incomplete Data Regression Models," The American Statistician, American Statistical Association, vol. 61, pages 79-90, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bes:amstat:v:61:y:2007:m:february:p:79-90
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    Cited by:

    1. Fitzpatrick, Trevor & Mues, Christophe, 2016. "An empirical comparison of classification algorithms for mortgage default prediction: evidence from a distressed mortgage market," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 249(2), pages 427-439.
    2. Cain Polidano & Ha Vu, 2012. "Labour Market Impacts from Disability Onset," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n22, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Dardanoni, Valentino & Modica, Salvatore & Peracchi, Franco, 2011. "Regression with imputed covariates: A generalized missing-indicator approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 162(2), pages 362-368, June.
    4. Fulvio Castellacci & José Miguel Natera, 2011. "A new panel dataset for cross-country analyses of national systems, growth and development (CANA)," Working Papers del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 1105, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.
    5. Lê, Félice & Diez Roux, Ana & Morgenstern, Hal, 2013. "Effects of child and adolescent health on educational progress," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 57-66.
    6. repec:eee:econom:v:199:y:2017:i:2:p:141-155 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Gedikoglu, Haluk & Parcell, Joseph L., 2013. "Implications of Survey Sampling Design for Missing Data Imputation," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149679, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Valentino Dardanoni & Giuseppe De Luca & Salvatore Modica & Franco Peracchi, 2012. "A generalized missing-indicator approach to regression with imputed covariates," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 12(4), pages 575-604, December.
    9. Brady T. West & Patricia Berglund & Steven G. Heeringa, 2008. "A closer examination of subpopulation analysis of complex-sample survey data," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(4), pages 520-531, December.
    10. Siddique, Juned & Harel, Ofer, 2009. "MIDAS: A SAS Macro for Multiple Imputation Using Distance-Aided Selection of Donors," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 29(i09).
    11. Schomaker, Michael & Heumann, Christian, 2014. "Model selection and model averaging after multiple imputation," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 758-770.
    12. Hapfelmeier, A. & Ulm, K., 2014. "Variable selection by Random Forests using data with missing values," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 129-139.
    13. Hapfelmeier, A. & Hothorn, T. & Ulm, K., 2012. "Recursive partitioning on incomplete data using surrogate decisions and multiple imputation," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 1552-1565.
    14. repec:bla:jeurec:v:14:y:2016:i:6:p:1253-1286 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. David (David Patrick) Madden, 2012. "The relationship between low birthweight and socioeconomic status in Ireland," Working Papers 201214, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    16. Simon Trimborn & Wolfgang Karl Härdle, 2015. "CRIX or evaluating Blockchain based currencies," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2015-048, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    17. Rachel Griffith & Rodrigo Lluberas & Melanie Lührmann, 2016. "Gluttony And Sloth? Calories, Labor Market Activity And The Rise Of Obesity," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(6), pages 1253-1286, December.
    18. Lars Oddershede & Simon Walker & Wolfgang Stöhr & David T. Dunn & Alejandro Arenas-Pinto & Nicholas I. Paton & Mark Sculpher, 2016. "Cost Effectiveness of Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Versus Standard Triple Therapy in the Long-Term Management of HIV Patients: Analysis Using Evidence from the PIVOT Trial," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(8), pages 795-804, August.
    19. Zhong, Hua & Hu, Wuyang, 2015. "Farmers’ Willingness to Engage in Best Management Practices: an Application of Multiple Imputation," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196962, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    20. repec:hal:journl:peer-00815561 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Consentino, Fabrizio & Claeskens, Gerda, 2010. "Order selection tests with multiply imputed data," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(10), pages 2284-2295, October.
    22. Kristian Kleinke & Mark Stemmler & Jost Reinecke & Friedrich Lösel, 2011. "Efficient ways to impute incomplete panel data," AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis, Springer;German Statistical Society, vol. 95(4), pages 351-373, December.
    23. repec:pal:jorsoc:v:61:y:2010:i:3:d:10.1057_jors.2009.66 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. McDonough, Ian K. & Millimet, Daniel L., 2017. "Missing data, imputation, and endogeneity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 199(2), pages 141-155.

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