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Networks and Economic Behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Matthew O. Jackson

    () (Department of Economics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-6072)

Abstract

Recent analyses of social networks, both empirical and theoretical, are discussed, with a focus on how social networks influence economic behavior, as well as how social networks form. Some challenges of such research are discussed as are some of the important considerations for the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew O. Jackson, 2009. "Networks and Economic Behavior," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 489-513, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:anr:reveco:v:1:y:2009:p:489-513
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    File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.economics.050708.143238
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Manuel Arellano & Stéphane Bonhomme, 2017. "Nonlinear Panel Data Methods for Dynamic Heterogeneous Agent Models," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 9(1), pages 471-496, September.
    2. Patacchini, Eleonora & Arduini, Tiziano, 2016. "Residential choices of young Americans," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 69-81.
    3. Gal Oestreicher-Singer & Arun Sundararajan, 2012. "The Visible Hand? Demand Effects of Recommendation Networks in Electronic Markets," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(11), pages 1963-1981, November.
    4. Bennett, Daniel & Chiang, Chun-Fang & Malani, Anup, 2015. "Learning during a crisis: The SARS epidemic in Taiwan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-18.
    5. repec:eee:pubeco:v:156:y:2017:i:c:p:73-80 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Eyal Carmi & Gal OEstreicher-Singer & Arun Sundararajan, 2010. "Is Oprah Contagious? Identifying Demand Spillovers in Product Networks," Working Papers 10-18, NET Institute.
    7. Lea Ellwardt & Penélope Hernández & Guillem Martínez-Canovas & Manuel Muñoz-Herrera, 2014. "Conflict and segregation in networks: An experiment on the interplay between individual preferences and social influence," Discussion Papers in Economic Behaviour 0114, University of Valencia, ERI-CES.
    8. Neilson, William & Wichmann, Bruno, 2014. "Social networks and non-market valuations," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 155-170.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    networks; social networks; economic networks;

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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