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Ciclos largos de nivel de vida biológico en España (1750-1950): propuesta metodológica y evidencias locales

Author

Listed:
  • Antonio D. Cámara

    () (Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona y Centre d’Estudis Demogràfics)

  • Joan García Román

    () (Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona y Centre d’Estudis Demogràfics)

Abstract

This work proposes an applied methodology based on the logistic regression to establish the sign of long-term trends in height from male anthropometric data collected since the Ancient Regime when mandatory conscription system was implemented in Spain. Data refer to male cohorts born from mid 18th century to mid 20th century. Broad cohort aggregations and control on the minimum required height as well as on age and municipality serve to implement the logistic regression model. Results display a downward trend in stature for cohorts born throughout the 19th century taking those born prior to 1800 as the reference. These results are statistically significant for the cohort group 1850-1899 as well as for those born after 1900 who display a clear recovery. Given that the 19th-century local series constructed in Spain up to now show similar trends, we think that these outcomes may serve as a first valid approach to the trends followed by the nutritional status prior to the socioeconomic modernization process experienced by Spain. KEY Classification-JEL: I39, I19, N50, P25

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio D. Cámara & Joan García Román, 2010. "Ciclos largos de nivel de vida biológico en España (1750-1950): propuesta metodológica y evidencias locales," Investigaciones de Historia Económica (IHE) Journal of the Spanish Economic History Association, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica, vol. 6(02), pages 95-118.
  • Handle: RePEc:ahe:invest:v:06:y:2010:i:02:p:95-118
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, Gary S, 1988. "Family Economics and Macro Behavior," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(1), pages 1-13, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Biological living standards; Anthropometrics; Spain; 18-20th centuries;

    JEL classification:

    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics

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