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Wirtschaftstheoretische Grundlagen deutscher Arbeits-marktpolitik um 1900 – Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der öko¬nomischen Theorie der Arbeitsmarktpolitik

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  • Carsten Kasprzok

Abstract

Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts bildete sich in Deutschland die Arbeitslosigkeit als eigenständiges Problemfeld heraus, das nicht nur aus sozialpolitischer, sondern zunehmend aus ökonomischer Perspek¬tive beleuchtet wurde. Dabei wurde zum einen gefragt, ob und wie sozialpolitische Ziele ökonomisch sinnvoll erreicht werden können. Zum anderen wurden Arbeitsmarkt und Arbeitslosigkeit als eigenständiges allokationspolitisches Problem erkannt und erörtert. Die vorliegende Arbeit trägt die damals vorgetragenen wirtschaftstheoretischen Argumente zusammen, die für ein arbeitsmarktpolitisches Handeln ins Feld geführt wurden und zum Teil bis in unsere Tage in der arbeitsmarkt- und sozialpolitischen Diskussion verwendet werden, wie Informationsasymmetrie, moralisches Risiko oder die Idee eines ‚Dritten Arbeitsmarktes’.

Suggested Citation

  • Carsten Kasprzok, 2010. "Wirtschaftstheoretische Grundlagen deutscher Arbeits-marktpolitik um 1900 – Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der öko¬nomischen Theorie der Arbeitsmarktpolitik," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(3), pages 325-355.
  • Handle: RePEc:aeq:aeqsjb:v130_y2010_i3_q3_p325-355
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    JEL classification:

    • B1 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy

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