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On the Importance of Correcting Reported End Dates of Labor Market Programs


  • Marie Waller


With administrative data becoming increasingly important for empirical research, the quality of crucial variables of process generated data is of growing interest. This paper investigates reported end dates of further training programs in the German Integrated Employment Biographies Sample (IEBS) to gain insights on how to deal with this sensitive part of the IEBS in future studies and on how measurement error in program end dates affects evaluation results. Error-proneness of reported end dates in the IEBS is discussed, corrections are introduced and their impact on evaluation results is studied for different estimation frameworks using sensitivity analysis. Though there is considerable measurement error in the end dates that can be corrected, the effect on evaluation results is modest.

Suggested Citation

  • Marie Waller, 2008. "On the Importance of Correcting Reported End Dates of Labor Market Programs," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 128(2), pages 213-236.
  • Handle: RePEc:aeq:aeqsjb:v128_y2008_i2_q2_p213-236

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Biewen & Bernd Fitzenberger & Aderonke Osikominu & Marie Paul, 2014. "The Effectiveness of Public-Sponsored Training Revisited: The Importance of Data and Methodological Choices," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 837-897.
    2. Sarah Bernhard & Thomas Kruppe, 2012. "Effectiveness of Further Vocational Training in Germany – Empirical Findings for Persons Receiving Means-tested Unemployment Benefits," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 132(4), pages 501-526.
    3. Waller, Marie, 2008. "Further training for the unemployed : what can we learn about dropouts from administrative data?," FDZ Methodenreport 200804_en, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate


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