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Seasonal Movements in Security Prices II: Weekend, Holiday, Turn of the Month, and Intraday Effects


  • Thaler, Richard H


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  • Thaler, Richard H, 1987. "Seasonal Movements in Security Prices II: Weekend, Holiday, Turn of the Month, and Intraday Effects," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 169-177, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:1:y:1987:i:2:p:169-77

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1995. "Time-Series Minimum-Wage Studies: A Meta-analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 238-243, May.
    2. Krueger, Anne O, et al, 1991. "Report of the Commission on Graduate Education in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1035-1053, September.
    3. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 157-176, June.
    4. Hansen, W Lee, 1991. "The Education and Training of Economics Doctorates: Major Findings of the Executive Secretary of the American Economic Association's Commission on Graduate Education in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1054-1087, September.
    5. David Colander, 1998. "The Sounds of Silence: The Profession's Response to the COGEE Report," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 600-607.
    6. Frey, Bruno S, et al, 1984. "Consensus and Dissension among Economists: An Empirical Inquiry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(5), pages 986-994, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lisa A. Kramer & Mark J. Kamstra & Maurice D. Levi, 2000. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1005-1011, September.
    2. Sharma, Susan Sunila & Narayan, Paresh Kumar, 2014. "New evidence on turn-of-the-month effects," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 92-108.
    3. Guglielmo Caporale & Luis Gil-Alana & Alex Plastun & Inna Makarenko, 2016. "Intraday Anomalies and Market Efficiency: A Trading Robot Analysis," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 47(2), pages 275-295, February.
    4. Chang, Shao-Chi & Chen, Sheng-Syan & Chou, Robin K. & Lin, Yueh-Hsiang, 2012. "Local sports sentiment and returns of locally headquartered stocks: A firm-level analysis," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 309-318.
    5. A. Gregoriou & A. Kontonikas & N. Tsitsianis, 2004. "Does the day of the week effect exist once transaction costs have been accounted for? Evidence from the UK," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 215-220.
    6. Rayenda Khresna Brahmana & Chee-Wooi Hooy & Zamri Ahmad, 2012. "Psychological factors on irrational financial decision making: Case of day-of-the week anomaly," Humanomics: The International Journal of Systems and Ethics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 236-257, October.
    7. Kaustia, Markku & Rantapuska, Elias, 2016. "Does mood affect trading behavior?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-26.
    8. Kaustia, Markku & Rantapuska, Elias, 2013. "Does mood affect trading behavior?," SAFE Working Paper Series 4, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    9. Manfred Gartner, 2010. "Predicting the presidential election cycle in US stock prices: guinea pigs versus the pros," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(18), pages 1759-1765.
    10. B Harrison & D Paton, 2007. "Do fat tails matter in GARCH estimation: testing market efficiency in two transition economies," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 12(2), pages 15-26, September.
    11. Kayacetin, Volkan & Lekpek, Senad, 2016. "Turn-of-the-month effect: New evidence from an emerging stock market," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 142-157.
    12. Lahav, Eyal & Shavit, Tal & Benzion, Uri, 2016. "Can't wait to celebrate: Holiday euphoria, impulsive behavior and time preference," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 128-134.
    13. Barry Harrison & David Paton, 2004. "Do ‘Fat Tails’ Matter in GARCH Estimation? Stock Market Efficiency in Romania and the Czech Republic," Working Papers 2004/3, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
    14. Krzysztof Borowski, 2016. "Analysis Of Monthly Rates Of Return In April On The Example Of Selected World Stock Exchange Indices," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 11(2), pages 307-325, June.
    15. Dimitris Kenourgios & Aristeidis Samitas & Spyros Papathanasiou, 2005. "The Day of the Week Effect Patterns on Stock Market Return and Volatility: Evidence for the Athens Stock Exchange," Finance 0512028, EconWPA.

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