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Excise Taxes with Multiproduct Transactions


  • Stephen F. Hamilton


I examine excise taxes levied on multiproduct retailers. Excise taxes reduce equilibrium output and decrease equilibrium product variety in the short run, but taxes can raise output per product in the long run and induce entry. Excise taxes are overshifted into prices in a wide range of cases, including under linear and concave demand conditions, and excise taxes shift less than one-for-one into prices only when demand is highly convex. Multiproduct transactions substantively alter the efficiency of ad valorem and specific forms of excise taxes and affect the comparison of relative tax performance over short-run and long-run time horizons. (JEL H25, H32, L11, L13, L81)

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen F. Hamilton, 2009. "Excise Taxes with Multiproduct Transactions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 458-471, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:1:p:458-71 Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.1.458

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Laszlo Goerke & Frederik Herzberg & Thorsten Upmann, 2014. "Failure of ad valorem and specific tax equivalence under uncertainty," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 10(4), pages 387-402, December.
    2. Richards, Timothy J. & Hamilton, Stephen F., 2011. "Variety and Cost Pass-Through among Supermarket Retailers," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114815, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Kai A. Konrad & Florian Morath & Wieland Müller, 2014. "Taxation and Market Power," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 47(1), pages 173-202, February.
    4. Robert A. Ritz, 2014. "A new version of Edgeworth's taxation paradox," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 209-226, January.
    5. Hiroshi Aiura & Hikaru Ogawa, 2016. "Indirect Taxes in the Cross-border Shopping Model: A Monopolistic Competition Approach," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1014, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    6. Valido, Jorge & Pilar Socorro, M. & Hernández, Aday & Betancor, Ofelia, 2014. "Air transport subsidies for resident passengers when carriers have market power," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 388-399.
    7. Laszlo Goerke, 2012. "The Optimal Structure of Commodity Taxation in a Monopoly with Tax Avoidance or Evasion," Public Finance Review, , vol. 40(4), pages 519-536, July.
    8. Christos Kotsogiannis & Konstantinos Serfes, 2014. "The Comparison of ad Valorem and Specific Taxation under Uncertainty," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 16(1), pages 48-68, February.
    9. Richards, Timothy J. & Allender, William J. & Hamilton, Stephen F., 2012. "Commodity price inflation, retail pass-through and market power," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 50-57.
    10. Aiura, Hiroshi & Ogawa, Hikaru, 2013. "Unit tax versus ad valorem tax: A tax competition model with cross-border shopping," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 30-38.
    11. Laszlo Goerke, 2011. "Commodity tax structure under uncertainty in a perfectly competitive market," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 103(3), pages 203-219, July.
    12. Martin Peitz & Markus Reisinger, 2014. "Indirect Taxation in Vertical Oligopoly," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 709-755, December.
    13. Stephen F. Hamilton & Timothy J. Richards, 2009. "Product Differentiation, Store Differentiation, and Assortment Depth," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(8), pages 1368-1376, August.
    14. Danut, CHILAREZ & George-Sebastian, ENE, 2014. "Harmonisation And Fiscal Competition In The European Union," Management Strategies Journal, Constantin Brancoveanu University, vol. 23(1), pages 83-93.
    15. repec:bla:randje:v:48:y:2017:i:2:p:467-484 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Henrik Vetter, 2013. "Consumption taxes in monopolistic competition: a comment," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 110(3), pages 287-295, November.
    17. repec:kap:jeczfn:v:122:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00712-017-0538-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Vetter, Henrik, 2012. "Indirect taxation of monopolists: A tax on price," Economics Discussion Papers 2012-60, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    19. Reny, Philip J. & Wilkie, Simon J. & Williams, Michael A., 2012. "Tax incidence under imperfect competition: Comment," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 399-402.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H32 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Firm
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • L81 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Retail and Wholesale Trade; e-Commerce


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