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Changing Wage Structure and Black-White Wage Differentials

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  • Card, David
  • Lemieux, Thomas

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  • Card, David & Lemieux, Thomas, 1994. "Changing Wage Structure and Black-White Wage Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 29-33, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:84:y:1994:i:2:p:29-33
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrés F. Barrientos & Alexander Bolton & Tom Balmat & Jerome P. Reiter & John M. de Figueiredo & Ashwin Machanavajjhala & Yan Chen & Charles Kneifel & Mark DeLong, 2017. "A Framework for Sharing Confidential Research Data, Applied to Investigating Differential Pay by Race in the U. S. Government," NBER Working Papers 23534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Card, David & Lemieux, Thomas, 1996. "Wage dispersion, returns to skill, and black-white wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 319-361, October.
    3. Richard B. Freeman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1995. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 1-22 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • John M. Abowd & Richard B. Freeman, 1991. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market, pages 1-26 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • George J. Borjas & Richard B. Freeman, 1992. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 1-16 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Brownstone, David & Valletta, Robert G, 1996. "Modeling Earnings Measurement Error: A Multiple Imputation Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 705-717, November.
    5. Harry J. Holzer & Keith R. Ihlanfeldt, 1996. "Spatial factors and the employment of blacks at the firm level," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue May, pages 65-86.
    6. Nathan D. Grawe & Casey B. Mulligan, 2002. "Economic Interpretations of Intergenerational Correlations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 45-58, Summer.
    7. John S. Heywood & Daniel Parent, 2012. "Performance Pay and the White-Black Wage Gap," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(2), pages 249-290.
    8. Amelie F. Constant & Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2012. "The Russian–Ukrainian earnings divide," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(1), pages 1-35, January.
    9. Lance Lochner & Youngki Shin, 2014. "Understanding Earnings Dynamics: Identifying and Estimating the Changing Roles of Unobserved Ability, Permanent and Transitory Shocks," NBER Working Papers 20068, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. J. Bound & Harry J. Holzer, "undated". "Structural changes, employment outcomes, and population adjustments among whites and blacks: 1980-1990," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1057-95, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    11. Willem Thorbeck, 1997. "Disinflationary Monetary Policy and the Distribution of Income," Macroeconomics 9711008, EconWPA.
    12. Richey, Jeremiah & Tromp, Nikolas, 2016. "Decomposing Black-White Wage Gaps Across Distributions: Young U.S. Men and Women in 1990 vs. 2011," MPRA Paper 74335, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3143-3259 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Kahanec, Martin, 2005. "Two Faces of the ICT Revolution: Desegregation and Minority-Majority Earnings Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 1872, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. H. J. Holzer, "undated". "Employer skill needs and labor market outcome by race and gender," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1087-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

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