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The Effect of the 1933 Securities Act on Investor Information and the Performance of New Issues


  • Simon, Carol J


This paper examines the effects of changes in financial disclosure attributed to the Securities Act of 1933 on the distribution of returns earned by investors. The regulation's effects should be most pronounced where private information costs were the greatest. Empirical tests control for prior stock market issues (experience) and the existence of third-party appraisal. Findings suggest that, prior to regulation, investors held rational price expectations in markets characterized by low information costs. The dispersion of abnormal returns (investors' forecast errors) is significantly lower following the Securities Act. Copyright 1989 by American Economic Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon, Carol J, 1989. "The Effect of the 1933 Securities Act on Investor Information and the Performance of New Issues," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 295-318, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:79:y:1989:i:3:p:295-318

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hall, Robert E, 1978. "Stochastic Implications of the Life Cycle-Permanent Income Hypothesis: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(6), pages 971-987, December.
    2. Gregory Mankiw, N. & Shapiro, Matthew D., 1985. "Trends, random walks, and tests of the permanent income hypothesis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 165-174, September.
    3. Jones, Stephen R G & Stock, James H, 1987. "Demand Disturbances and Aggregate Fluctuations: The Implications of Near Rationality," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(385), pages 49-64, March.
    4. Cochrane, John H. & Sbordone, Argia M., 1988. "Multivariate estimates of the permanent components of GNP and stock prices," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 255-296.
    5. Larry G. Epstein & Stanley E. Zin, 1987. "Substitution, Risk Aversion and the Temporal Behaviour of Consumption and Asset Returns I: A Theoretical Framework," Working Papers 699, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    6. George A. Akerlof, 1979. "Irving Fisher on his Head: The Consequences of Constant Threshold-Target Monitoring of Money Holdings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 93(2), pages 169-187.
    7. John Y. Campbell & Angus Deaton, 1987. "Is Consumption Too Smooth?," NBER Working Papers 2134, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Flavin, Marjorie A, 1981. "The Adjustment of Consumption to Changing Expectations about Future Income," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 974-1009, October.
    9. Larry G. Epstein & Stanley E. Zin, 1987. "Substitution, Risk Aversion and the Temporal Behaviour of Consumption and Asset Returns II: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 698, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
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