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The coordination between education and employment policies

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  • Alka obadić

    ()
    (Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb)

  • Sanja Porić

    ()

Abstract

At the end of the 20th century, knowledge production has been radically transformed. As knew knowledge economies and US were becoming an increasing threat for EU, the Lisbon Strategy was set to treat the economic problems that EU is facing. This article discusses and evaluates the potential of the Lisbon Agenda and presents the ways how growth in GDP per capita and employability could be increased by synchronized education and employment policies. It is widely believed that jobs are becoming more and more demanding of skills and as a result workers need to upgrade their skills or risk loosing out in the competition for jobs in the new economy. The research confirms that the reason why many of these unemployed workers might be considered "unemployable in a modern economy" is their comparatively low level of education. Employment rates rise with educational attainment and higher educated individuals also face a more stable labour market than lower educated individuals. The research concludes that in situation of stable higher unemployment rates and higher demand for specific labour skills it is obvious that the coordination between employment and education policies is needed. To ensure employability, policies for promoting education and lifelong learning have to be adjusted to changes in the economy and society.

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File URL: http://web.efzg.hr/repec/pdf/Clanak%2008-02.pdf
File Function: First version, 2008
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb in its series EFZG Working Papers Series with number 0802.

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Length: 15
Date of creation: 31 Mar 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:zag:wpaper:0802

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Keywords: Lisbon Agenda; employment policy; education policy; lifelong learning; EU;

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  1. Temin, Peter, 2002. "The Golden Age of European growth reconsidered," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(01), pages 3-22, April.
  2. Plutarchos Sakellaris & Focco W. Vijselaar, 2005. "Capital Quality Improvement and the Sources of Growth in the Euro Area," CESifo Working Paper Series 1452, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Crafts, N.F.R, 1994. "The Golden Age of Economic Growth in Western Europe, 1950-73," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 427, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  4. Johansson, Börje & Karlsson, Charlie & Backman, Mikaela & Juusola, Pia, 2007. "The Lisbon Agenda From 2000 To 2010," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 106, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  5. Plutarchos Sakellaris & Focco Vijselaar, 2005. "Capital quality improvement and the sources of economic growth in the euro area," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 20(42), pages 267-306, 04.
  6. Gordon, Robert J, 2004. "Why Was Europe Left at the Station when America's Productivity Locomotive Departed?," CEPR Discussion Papers 4416, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Gavin Cameron, 2005. "Economic Policies for Growth and Employment," Economics Series Working Papers 249, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  8. Daniele Archibugi & Alberto Coco, 2005. "Is Europe Becoming the Most Dynamic Knowledge Economy in the World?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 433-459, 09.
  9. Gavin Cameron & Chris Wallace, 2002. "Macroeconomic Performance in the Bretton Woods Era and After," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(4), pages 479-494.
  10. Gordon Betcherman, 2000. "Structural Unemployment: How Important Are Labour Market Policies and Institutions?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 26(s1), pages 131-140, July.
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