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Contractual Conditions, Working conditions, Health and Well-Being in the British Household Panel Survey

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  • Robone, S
  • Jones, A. M
  • Rice, N

Abstract

We consider the effects of contractual and working conditions on self-assessed health and psychological well-being using twelve waves (1991/92 – 2002/2003) of the British Household Panel Survey. While one branch of the literature suggests that “atypical” contractual conditions have a significant impact on health and well-being, another suggests that health is damaged by adverse working conditions. As far as we are aware, previous studies have not explicitly considered the two factors jointly. Our aim is to combine the two branches of the literature to assess the distinct effects of contractual and working conditions on health and psychological well-being and how these effects vary across individuals. For self-assessed health the dependent variable is categorical, and we estimate non-linear dynamic panel ordered probit models, while for psychological well-being we estimate a dynamic linear specification. Our estimates show that being unsatisfied with the number of hours worked has a negative influence on the health of individuals who have a part-time job. Having a high level of employability appears to influence positively the health and psychological well-being of individuals with temporary job arrangements. Family structure appears to influence the health and well-being of workers with atypical contractual conditions.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 08/19.

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Date of creation: Jul 2008
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Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:08/19

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Postal: HEDG/HERC, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
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Web page: http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
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Keywords: working conditions; contractual conditions; self assessed health; psychological well-being; dynamic panel data models;

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Cited by:
  1. Maria Pereira & Filipe Coelho, 2013. "Work Hours and Well Being: An Investigation of Moderator Effects," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 235-253, March.
  2. Elena Cottini & Paolo Ghinetti, 2012. "Working Conditions, Lifestyles and Health," Economics Working Papers 2012-28, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
  3. Vincenzo Carrieri & Cinzia Di Novi & Rowena Jacobs & Silvana Robone, 2012. "Well-being and psychological consequences of temporary contracts: the case of younger Italian employees," Working Papers 079cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  4. Cottini, Elena & Lucifora, Claudio, 2010. "Mental Health and Working Conditions in European Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 4717, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Jones, Melanie K. & Latreille, Paul L. & Sloane, Peter J., 2011. "Job Anxiety, Work-Related Psychological Illness and Workplace Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 5809, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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