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The Effects of Job and Housing Location on Race/Gender Wage Differentials in Milwaukee: Testing the `Network Hypothesis'

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Author Info

  • Robert Drago

    (Univ. Wisconsin-Milwaukee)

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    Abstract

    This study considers the joint role of job and housing location as they affect the earnings of different race and gender groups. Building on Wial's (1991) case study of networks in Boston which distribute good jobs, the `network hypothesis' suggests that the channels which distribute high wage jobs inside Milwaukee county are connected to individuals who are predominantly white males and live outside of the county, thereby limiting access for others partly on the basis of race and gender and partly due to job and housing location. Data from the 1990 U.S. census are used to test this hypothesis. The The results are consistent with the network hypothesis.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 9404001.

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    Length: 28 pages
    Date of creation: 25 Apr 1994
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:9404001

    Note: 28 pages total in two WP5.1 files. VVdecode then Unzip (1.9 or Pkunzip) to retrieve.
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    Web page: http://128.118.178.162

    Related research

    Keywords: discrimination; wage determination; segmentation;

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    References

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    1. Price, Richard & Mills, Edwin, 1985. "Race and residence in earnings determination," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-18, January.
    2. Belman, Dale & Heywood, John S, 1991. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education: An Examination on Women and Minorities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 720-24, November.
    3. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
    4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    5. Folbre, Nancy, 1982. "Exploitation Comes Home: A Critique of the Marxian Theory of Family Labour," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 317-29, December.
    6. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    7. Greene, William H, 1981. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error: Comment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(3), pages 795-98, May.
    8. Kwabena Gyimah-Brempong & Rudy Fichtenbaum, 1993. "Black-white wage differential: The relative importance of human capital and labor market structure," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 19-52, March.
    9. A. G. Holtmann & Todd L. Idson, 1993. "Wage Determination of Registered Nurses in Proprietary and Nonprofit Nursing Homes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 55-79.
    10. David Neumark, 1987. "Employers' discriminatory behavior and the estimation of wage discrimination," Special Studies Papers 227, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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