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Productivity in Australia's wholesale and retail trade

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Author Info

  • Alan Johnston

    (Productivity Commission)

  • Darrell Porter

    (Productivity Commission)

  • Trevor Cobbold

    (Productivity Commission)

  • Robert Dolamore

    (Productivity Commission)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Examines the productivity performance of the wholesale and retail trade sectors in light of their significant contribution to Australia’s record productivity performance in the 1990s. Fundamental changes in the nature and operations of wholesale trade, in particular, have brought marked improvements in productivity performance over the 1990s. The paper examines the main sources of the improved productivity growth in wholesale and retail trade including the adoption of productivity- enhancing and labour saving technologies, the role of increased competition as a catalyst for rationalisation, institutional reforms such as changes to industrial relations legislation, and factors specific to particular sub-industries, such as underlying demand conditions.

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    File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/dev/papers/0105/0105003.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0105003.

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    Date of creation: 21 May 2001
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0105003

    Note: Type of Document - PDF; prepared on IBM PC; to print on HP;
    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://128.118.178.162

    Related research

    Keywords: productivity - wholesale trade - retail trade - retailing - distribution - wholesaling - trading hours - cars - motor vehicles - computer hardware - petroleum - clothing - soft goods - recreational goods;

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    1. Edward N. Wolff, 1999. "The productivity paradox: evidence from indirect indicators of service sector productivity growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(2), pages 281-308, April.
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