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Ownership and Productive Efficiency: Evidence from Estonia

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  • Derek C. Jones
  • Niels Mygind

Abstract

Privatization in Estonia has produced varied ownership configurations. This enables hypotheses on the productivity effects of different ownership forms to be tested. Findings are based on fixed effects production function models and are estimated using a large, random sample of firms. Depending on the particular specification (and relative to state ownership) we find that: i) private ownership is 13-22% more efficient; (ii) all types of private ownership are more productive, though managerial ownership has the biggest effects (21-32%) and ownership by domestic outsiders has the smallest impact (0-15%). The joint hypothesis that privatization coefficients are equal is rejected. Findings are robust with respect to choice of technology and the use of instrumental variable estimates. These results provide only partial support for the standard theory of privatization and stronger support for theorists who argue that some forms of insider ownership may constitute preferable forms of corporate goverance in some circumstances.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan in its series William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series with number 385.

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Length: pages
Date of creation: 01 Jul 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2001-385

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Cited by:
  1. Wendy Carlin & Steven Fries & Mark Schaffer & Paul Seabright, 2001. "Competition and Enterprise Performance in Transition Economies from a Cross-Country Survey," CERT Discussion Papers 0101, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
  2. Wendy Carlin & Steven Fries & Mark Schaffer & Paul Seabright, 2001. "Competition and Enterprise Performance in Transition Economies: Evidence from a Cross-country Survey," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 376, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  3. Panagiotis Staikouras, 2004. "Structural Reform Policy: Privatisation and Beyond—The Case of Greece," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 373-398, May.
  4. Derek Jones & Panu Kalmi & Niels Mygind, 2005. "Choice of Ownership Structure and Firm Performance: Evidence from Estonia," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 83-107.
  5. Bersant Hobdari & Aleksandra Gregoric & Evis Sinani, 2011. "The role of firm ownership on internationalization: evidence from two transition economies," Journal of Management and Governance, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 393-413, August.
  6. Amess, Kevin & Roberts, Barbara M., 2007. "The productivity effects of privatization: The case of Polish cooperatives," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 354-366.

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