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Two decades of reform : the changing organization dynamics of Chinese industrial firms

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  • Yusuf, Shahid
  • Nabeshima, Kaoru

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, China has begun gradually integrating with the global system. In doing so the country has moved toward its own unique brand of market socialism, which recognizes private ownership, and is adopting market institutions and pursuing industrial change within the framework of an urban economic environment. The process of transition has now permeated every corner of Chinese life and no organization has been left untouched. Yet industrial organization in China-especially in the state sector-has been slow to shed many of the distinctive structural characteristics of the old line Maoist era state enterprises. The main prong of the industrial strategy in support of urban change is ownership reform that transforms state-owned enterprises into corporate entities with majority state ownership or places them wholly in private hands, in the process also bolstering the incentives for and the dynamism of the private sector. While the central government spearheads the ownership reform initiative, in the majority of cases the actual implementation is in the hands of municipal, county, and prefectural governments that must coordinate their efforts with other factors influencing urban changes. This paper situates industrial change in China within the context of urban development and examines the interplay of broad reform strategy with local implementation, and its actual practice by the reformed firms.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3806.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2006
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3806

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Related research

Keywords: Municipal Financial Management; Private Participation in Infrastructure; Economic Theory&Research; State Owned Enterprise Reform; Microfinance;

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References

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  1. Djankov, Simeon & Murrell, Peter, 2002. "Enterprise Restructuring in Transition: A Quantitative Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers 3319, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Shahid Yusuf & Kaoru Nabeshima & Dwight H. Perkins, 2005. "Under New Ownership : Privatizing China's State-Owned Enterprises," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7399.
  3. Maryann Feldman & Roger Martin, 2004. "Jurisdictional Advantage," NBER Working Papers 10802, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Shahid Yusuf & M. Anjum Altaf & Kaoru Nabeshima, 2004. "Global Production Networking and Technological Change in East Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14918.
  5. Gary H. Jefferson & Zhong Kaifeng, 2002. "An Investigation of Firm-Level R&D Capabilities in East Asia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 583, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Cheung Kui-yin & Lin, Ping, 2004. "Spillover effects of FDI on innovation in China: Evidence from the provincial data," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 25-44.
  7. Jeffry M. Netter & William L. Megginson, 2001. "From State to Market: A Survey of Empirical Studies on Privatization," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 321-389, June.
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Cited by:
  1. World Bank, 2007. "Brazil - São Paulo : Inputs for a Sustainable Competitive City Strategy, Volume 2. Background Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7986, The World Bank.
  2. James R. Barth & Gerard Caprio Jr., 2007. "China's Changing Financial System: Can It Catch Up With, or Even Drive Growth," NFI Policy Briefs 2007-PB-05, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.

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