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Agricultural development : issues, evidence, and consequences

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  • Mundlak, Yair
  • Larson, Donald F.
  • Crego, Al

Abstract

A comprehensive examination of data from many countries shows that in 1967-92, eighty-one percent of the world's population lived in countries where agricultural growth exceeded population growth. Moreover, that growth occurred as agricultural prices declined. Productivity gains are a dominant characteristic of agriculture for the period. Average productivity increased for land and labor. Moreover, agricultural productivity gains were greater than average productivity gains for the economy in 80 percent of the countries studied. Measuring the effects of technology choice on productivity is crucial to understanding the determinants of agricultural growth. After selectively reviewing applied production studies, the authors conclude that the choice-of-technique method, which has its roots in Tinter's early production function studies, is best suited for examining the determinants of agricultural growth. Investments in technology have yielded large gains for agriculture, and the benefits have been passed on to customers in the form of lower prices. Thus history justifies public spending on agricultural research.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 1811.

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Date of creation: 31 Aug 1997
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1811

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Keywords: Labor Policies; Environmental Economics&Policies; Economic Theory&Research; Agricultural Knowledge&Information Systems; Banks&Banking Reform; Environmental Economics&Policies; Economic Theory&Research; Agricultural Knowledge&Information Systems; Economic Growth; Banks&Banking Reform;

References

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  1. Larson, Donald & Mundlak, Yair, 1997. "On the Intersectoral Migration of Agricultural Labor," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 295-319, January.
  2. Binswanger, Hans & Yang, Maw-Cheng & Bowers, Alan & Mundlak, Yair, 1987. "On the determinants of cross-country aggregate agricultural supply," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 111-131.
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Cited by:
  1. Eberhardt, Markus & Teal, Francis, 2009. "A Common Factor Approach to Spatial Heterogeneity in Agricultural Productivity Analysis," MPRA Paper 15810, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Larson, Donald & Butzer, Rita & Mundlak, Yair & Crego, Al, . "Sectoral Investment and Capital," Instructional Stata datasets for econometrics sectinvcap, Boston College Department of Economics.
  3. Mundlak, Yair, 2003. "Economic Growth: Lessons From Two Centuries Of American Agriculture," Discussion Papers 14986, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Agricultural Economics and Management.
  4. Reddy, A Amarender, 2013. "Rural transformation since 1970s in Dokur Village of Andhra Pradesh, India," MPRA Paper 30784, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Nov 2013.
  5. Crego, Al & Larson, Donald & Butzer, Rita & Mundlak, Yair, 1998. "A new database on investment and capital for agriculture and manufacturing," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2013, The World Bank.
  6. Larson, David F. & Butzer, Rita & Mundlak, Yair & Crego, Al, 2000. "A Cross-Country Database for Sector Investment and Capital," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 371-91, May.
  7. Jakob B Madsen, 2011. "A q Model of House Prices," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 03-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  8. Butzer, Rita & Mundlak, Yair & Larson, Donald F., 2010. "Measures of fixed capital in agriculture," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5472, The World Bank.

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