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Financial Literacy, Household Investment and Household Debt: Evidence from Switzerland

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  • Brown, Martin

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  • Graf, Roman

    ()

Abstract

We use a novel, representative survey to document the level of financial literacy among Swiss households and to examine how financial literacy is related to household investment and borrowing. We find that half of the respondents were able to answer three questions on basic financial concepts (compound interest, inflation and risk diversification) correctly. Financial literacy is lower among low-income and immigrant households as well as among women. Young households seem to be less familiar with the concept of inflation, while retirees are less familiar with the concepts of compound interest and risk diversification. We find that financial literacy is strongly correlated with financial market participation, voluntary retirement saving and mortgage borrowing.

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File URL: http://www1.vwa.unisg.ch/RePEc/usg/sfwpfi/WPF-1301.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of St. Gallen, School of Finance in its series Working Papers on Finance with number 1301.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:usg:sfwpfi:2013:01

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  1. Shizuka Sekita, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Japan," CeRP Working Papers 108, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  2. John Gathergood, . "Self-Control, Financial Literacy and Consumer Over-Indebtedness," Discussion Papers 12/02, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
  3. Klapper, Leora & Panos, Georgios A., 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement planning: the Russian case," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 599-618, October.
  4. Almenberg, Johan & Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement planning in Sweden," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 585-598, October.
  5. van Rooij, Maarten & Lusardi, Annamaria & Alessie, Rob, 2011. "Financial literacy and stock market participation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 449-472, August.
  6. Alessie, Rob & Van Rooij, Maarten & Lusardi, Annamaria, 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement preparation in the Netherlands," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 527-545, October.
  7. Meier, Stephan & Sprenger, Charles, 2009. "Present-Biased Preferences and Credit Card Borrowing," IZA Discussion Papers 4198, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Fornero, Elsa & Monticone, Chiara, 2011. "Financial literacy and pension plan participation in Italy," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 547-564, October.
  9. Annamaria Lusardi & Peter Tufano, 2009. "Debt Literacy, Financial Experiences, and Overindebtedness," CeRP Working Papers 83, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  10. McCarthy, Yvonne, 2011. "Behavioural Characteristics and Financial Distress," Research Technical Papers 6/RT/11, Central Bank of Ireland.
  11. Diana Crossan & David Feslier & Roger Hurnard, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in New Zealand," CeRP Working Papers 113, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  12. Lusardi, Annamaria & Tufano, Peter, 2009. "Debt literacy, financial experiences, and overindebtedness," CFS Working Paper Series 2009/08, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  13. Johan Almenberg & Jenny Säve-Söderbergh, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Sweden," CeRP Working Papers 112, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  14. Annamaria Lusardi & Peter Tufano, 2009. "Debt Literacy, Financial Experiences, and Overindebtedness," NBER Working Papers 14808, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Crossan, Diana & Feslier, David & Hurnard, Roger, 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement planning in New Zealand," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 619-635, October.
  16. Dean Karlan & Jonathan Zinman, 2008. "Lying About Borrowing," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 6(2-3), pages 510-521, 04-05.
  17. Sekita, Shizuka, 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement planning in Japan," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 637-656, October.
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