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The Political Economy of Economic Reforms in Argentina

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Author Info

  • Juliana Bambaci

    (Center of Studies for Institutional Development, Fundacion Gobierno y Sociedad)

  • Tamara Saront

    (Center of Studies for Institutional Development, Fundacion Gobierno y Sociedad)

  • Mariano Tommasi

    ()
    (Center of Studies for Institutional Development, Fundacion Gobierno y Sociedad & Department of Economics, Universidad de San Andres)

Abstract

In 1989, Argentina entered a process of sweeping transformation of its economic institutions which provided for the (temporary) recovery of economic growth and the taming of inflation. The Argentine experience with market-oriented reforms has been regarded by the literature as a salient case of radical and 'unconstrained' reform. Yet, a closer scrutiny portrays that the building and maintenance of a pro-"reform coalition determined the pace, depth and characteristics of the 'new economic institutions'. The idiosyncrasies of Argentina's political institutions, in turn, conditioned this coalition-building strategy. The same idiosyncrasies were at play in the 2001/2002 collapse of the convertibility regime and ensuing social and political chaos.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia in its series Working Papers with number 43.

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Date of creation: Mar 2002
Date of revision: Mar 2002
Publication status: Published in Policy Reform, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2002, pages 75-88
Handle: RePEc:sad:wpaper:43

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Keywords: political economy; policy; reform; Argentina;

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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Mariano Tommasi, 1995. "Why Does it Take a Nixon to go to China?," UCLA Economics Working Papers 728, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Mondino, Guillermo & Sturzenegger, Federico & Tommasi, Mariano, 1996. "Recurrent High Inflation and Stabilization: A Dynamic Game," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(4), pages 981-96, November.
  3. John Williamson, 1994. "The Political Economy of Policy Reform," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 68.
  4. Eduardo Lora, 1997. "A Decade of Structural Reforms in Latin America: What Has Been Reformed and How to Measure It," IDB Publications 6428, Inter-American Development Bank.
  5. Eduardo Lora, 2001. "Structural reforms in Latin America: What has been reformed and how to measure it?," Research Department Publications 4287, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Jac C. Heckelman & Stephen Knack, 2008. "Foreign Aid and Market-Liberalizing Reform," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 524-548, 08.
  2. Marcos Buscaglia, 2004. "The Political Economy of Argentina's Debacle," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 43-65.
  3. Mariano Tommasi, 2003. "Crises, institutions politiques et réformes politiques : le bon, le mauvais et l'affreux," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 17(2), pages 49-81.
  4. Mariano Tommasi & Alvaro Forteza & German Herrera, 2005. "Understanding Reform in Latin America," Working Papers 88, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Dec 2005.
  5. Marcos A. Buscaglia, 2003. "The Political-Economy of Argentina’s Debacle," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2003-594, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Héctor G. González Padilla, 2009. "La privatización de bancos públicos provinciales en Argentina en 1993-2001," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 401, Universidad del CEMA.
  7. Glen Biglaiser & Karl DeRouen, 2011. "How soon is now? The effects of the IMF on economic reforms in Latin America," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 189-213, July.
  8. Mariano Tommasi, 2002. "Crisis, Political Institutions and Policy Reform: It Is Not the Policy, It Is the Polity, Stupid," Working Papers 49, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Jun 2004.
  9. Sebastian M. Saiegh & Mariano Tommasi, 1999. "Why is Argentina’s Fiscal Federalism so Inefficient? Entering the Labyrinth," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 169-209, May.

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