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Education, Work, and Crime: Theory and Evidence

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  • Lochner, L.

Abstract

This paper develops and empirically examines a dynamic model of decisions to work, invest in human capital, and commit crime. By making all three activities endogenous, the model makes a number of new and interesting contributions to the study of crime. First, the model explains why older, more intelligent, and more educated workers tend to commit less of some property crimes than others. Second, the model is useful for analyzing the impacts of education, training, and work subsidies on criminal behavior. Third, unobserved age differences in on-the-job skill investment explain why wages and crime are more negatively correlated at older ages. Fourth, the model predicts a rise in youth crime should accompany the recent rise in returns to skills. Finally, the model suggests that law enforcement policies increase education, training and labor supply, while reducing criminal activity.

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File URL: http://rcer.econ.rochester.edu/RCERPAPERS/rcer_465.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER) in its series RCER Working Papers with number 465.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:roc:rocher:465

Contact details of provider:
Postal: University of Rochester, Center for Economic Research, Department of Economics, Harkness 231 Rochester, New York 14627 U.S.A.

Related research

Keywords: EDUCATION ; CRIMES ; WORK;

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References

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  1. James Heckman & Lance Lochner & Christopher Taber, 1998. "Explaining Rising Wage Inequality: Explanations With A Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Labor Earnings With Heterogeneous Agents," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(1), pages 1-58, January.
  2. Richard B. Freeman, 1991. "Crime and the Employment of Disadvantaged Youths," NBER Working Papers 3875, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Bound, John & Freeman, Richard B, 1992. "What Went Wrong? The Erosion of Relative Earnings and Employment among Young Black Men in the 1980s," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 107(1), pages 201-32, February.
  4. Dan Usher, 1993. "Education as a Deterrent to Crime," Working Papers, Queen's University, Department of Economics 870, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  5. Lance Lochner, 2005. "Individual Perceptions of the Criminal Justice System," 2005 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 452, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Mustard, David B, 2001. "Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in Sentencing: Evidence from the U.S. Federal Courts," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(1), pages 285-314, April.
  7. Heckman, James J & Lochner, Lance & Taber, Christopher, 1998. "Tax Policy and Human-Capital Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 293-97, May.
  8. Steven D. Levitt, 1998. "Juvenile Crime and Punishment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1156-1185, December.
  9. Donohue, John J, III & Siegelman, Peter, 1998. "Allocating Resources among Prisons and Social Programs in the Battle against Crime," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 1-43, January.
  10. Richard B. Freeman, 1996. "Why Do So Many Young American Men Commit Crimes and What Might We Do About It?," NBER Working Papers 5451, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Casey B. Mulligan, 1999. "Substition over Time: Another Look at Life-Cycle Labor Supply," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1998, volume 13, pages 75-152 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. John Cawley & Karen Conneely & James Heckman & Edward Vytlacil, 1996. "Cognitive Ability, Wages, and Meritocracy," NBER Working Papers 5645, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Tauchen, Helen & Witte, Ann Dryden & Griesinger, Harriet, 1994. "Criminal Deterrence: Revisiting the Issue with a Birth Cohort," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(3), pages 399-412, August.
  14. Grogger, Jeff, 1998. "Market Wages and Youth Crime," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(4), pages 756-91, October.
  15. W. Kip Viscusi, 1986. "Market Incentives for Criminal Behavior," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: The Black Youth Employment Crisis, pages 301-351 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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