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Intergenerational talent transmission, inequality, and social mobility

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Author Info

  • Napel, Stefan

    ()
    (University of Hamburg)

  • Schneider, Andrea

    ()
    (Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg)

Abstract

The paper investigates the effects of intra-family talent transmission when human capital exhibits indivisibilities and parental financing of education involves borrowing constraints. Positive talent correlation reduces social mobility but steady state inequality and macroeconomic history-dependence are not affected.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg in its series Working Paper with number 52/2006.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ris:vhsuwp:2006_052

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Related research

Keywords: Intergenerational mobility; Inequality; Occupational choice; History- dependence;

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References

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  1. Bhashkar Mazumder, 2005. "Fortunate Sons: New Estimates of Intergenerational Mobility in the United States Using Social Security Earnings Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 235-255, May.
  2. Couch, K.A. & Morand, O.F., 2005. "Inequality, mobility, and the transmission of ability," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 365-377, June.
  3. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52, January.
  4. Maoz, Yishay D & Moav, Omer, 1999. "Intergenerational Mobility and the Process of Development," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(458), pages 677-97, October.
  5. Dilip Mookherjee & Debraj Ray, 2000. "Persistent Inequality," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-108, Boston University - Department of Economics, revised Oct 2002.
  6. Jäntti, Markus & Bratsberg, Bernt & Røed, Knut & Raaum, Oddbjørn & Naylor, Robin & Österbacka, Eva & Björklund, Anders & Eriksson, Tor, 2006. "American Exceptionalism in a New Light: A Comparison of Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 1938, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Peter Arcidiacono, 2005. "Affirmative Action in Higher Education: How Do Admission and Financial Aid Rules Affect Future Earnings?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(5), pages 1477-1524, 09.
  8. Loury, Glenn C, 1981. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Distribution of Earnings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 843-67, June.
  9. Freeman, Scott, 1996. "Equilibrium Income Inequality among Identical Agents," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 1047-64, October.
  10. Dilip Mokherjee & Stefan Napel, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility and Macroeconomic History Dependence," Discussion Papers 1, Aboa Centre for Economics.
  11. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1979. "An Equilibrium Theory of the Distribution of Income and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1153-89, December.
  12. Jimmy Chan & Erik Eyster, 2003. "Does Banning Affirmative Action Lower College Student Quality?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(3), pages 858-872, June.
  13. Ljungqvist, Lars, 1993. "Economic underdevelopment : The case of a missing market for human capital," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 219-239, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dilip Mookherjee & Stefan Napel & Debraj Ray, 2010. "Aspirations, Segregation, and Occupational Choice," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(1), pages 139-168, 03.
  2. Schneider, Andrea, 2010. "Redistributive taxation vs. education subsidies: Fostering equality and social mobility in an intergenerational model," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 597-605, August.
  3. Ryo Arawatari & Tetsuo Ono, 2009. "Inequality, Mobility and Redistributive Taxation in a Finance-constrained Economy," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-28, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  4. Hidalgo Cabrillana, Ana, 2009. "Endogenous capital market imperfections, human capital, and intergenerational mobility," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 285-298, November.

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