Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

How Do FTAs Affect Exporting Firms in Thailand?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Wignaraja, Ganeshan

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Olfindo, Rosechin

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Pupphavesa, Wisarn

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Panpiemras, Jirawat

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Ongkittikul, Sumet

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

Thailand-an outward-oriented regional production hub-is one of East Asia's most active users of free trade agreements (FTAs) as an instrument of commercial policy. By December 2009, Thailand had 11 concluded FTAs, and more were either under negotiation or proposed. Thai trade negotiators have striven to secure market access via FTAs, but little is known on how FTAs actually affect exporting firms. A survey of 221 exporters in leading sectors forms the basis for the first systematic study of the business impact of FTAs in Thailand. Key findings are as follows: (i) 24.9% of respondents used Thai FTAs as of 2007-2008, and this figure seems set to rise; (ii) 45.9% of respondents said that FTAs had influenced their business plans; (iii) 26.2% of firms felt that dealing with multiple rules of origin adds to business costs, and this is estimated to be less than 1% of export sales; (iv) more than half the sample firms have consulted with government and business associations on FTAs; and (v) a significant demand existed for business development services to adjust to FTAs, particularly for small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The findings suggest that Thailand should refine its FTA strategy to take better advantage of regional trade agreements. The study concludes with specific recommendations to improve business awareness of FTAs, encourage greater utilization of FTA preferences, increase competitiveness of local firms, and mitigate the potential effect of multiple rules of origin.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.adbi.org/working-paper/2010/01/29/3449.fta.affect.exporting.firms.thailand/
File Function: Full text
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Asian Development Bank Institute in its series ADBI Working Papers with number 190.

as in new window
Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 29 Jan 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0190

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Kasumigaseki Building 8F, 3-2-5, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku,, Tokyo 100-6008, Japan
Phone: (81-3)3593-5500
Fax: (81-3) 3593-5571
Email:
Web page: http://www.adbi.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: thailand fta impact; thailand afta business; thailand economy ftas;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Kuroiwa, Ikuo, 2006. "Rules of Origin and Local Content in East Asia," IDE Discussion Papers 78, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  2. Masahiro Kawai & Ganeshan Wignaraja, 2009. "The Asian “Noodle Bowl”:Is It Serious for Business?," Working Papers id:1936, eSocialSciences.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0190. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Robert Hugh Davis).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.