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Zipf’s and Gibrat’s laws for migrations

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  • Clemente, Jesús
  • González-Val, Rafael
  • Olloqui, Irene

Abstract

This paper analyses the evolution of the size distribution of the stock of emigrants in the period 1960-2000. Has the distribution of the stock of emigrants changed or has there been some convergence? This is the question discussed in this work. In particular, we are interested in testing the fulfillment of two empirical regularities studied in urban economics: Zipf’s law, which postulates that the product between the rank and size of a population is constant; and Gibrat’s law, witch states that growth rate of a variable is independent of its initial size. We use parametric and non-parametric methods and apply them to absolute (stock of emigrants) and relative (migration density, defined as the quotient between the stock of emigrants of a country and its total population)measurements.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 9731.

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Date of creation: 12 Jul 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:9731

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Keywords: Migration distribution; Zipf´s law; Gibrat´s law;

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  1. Carrington, William J & Detragiache, Enrica & Vishwanath, Tara, 1996. "Migration with Endogenous Moving Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 909-30, September.
  2. Xavier Gabaix & Yannis M. Ioannides, 2003. "The Evolution of City Size Distributions," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0310, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  3. Rafael González-Val & Marcos Sanso-Navarro, 2010. "Gibrat’s law for countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 1371-1389, September.
  4. Y Ioannides & Henry Overman, 2000. "Zipfs Law for Cities: An Empirical Examination," CEP Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE dp0484, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Henry G. Overman & Yannis Menelaos Ioannides, 2001. "Cross-sectional evolution of the U.S. city size distribution," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 584, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Alberto Alesina & Enrico Spolaore & Romain Wacziarg, 1997. "Economic Integration and Political Disintegration," NBER Working Papers 6163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Larramona, Gemma & Sanso, Marcos, 2006. "Migration dynamics, growth and convergence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 2261-2279, November.
  8. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Galton's Fallacy and Tests of the Convergence Hypothesis," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 820, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Spolaore, Enrico & Wacziarg, Romain, 2005. "Borders and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5202, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Ghatak, Subrata & Levine, Paul & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 1996. " Migration Theories and Evidence: An Assessment," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(2), pages 159-98, June.
  11. Quah, Danny T., 1996. "Empirics for economic growth and convergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1353-1375, June.
  12. Jan Eeckhout, 2004. "Gibrat's Law for (All) Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1429-1451, December.
  13. Rose, Andrew K, 2005. "Cities and Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5235, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Gilles Duranton, 2007. "Urban Evolutions: The Fast, the Slow, and the Still," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 197-221, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Masood Gheasi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2013. "Special issue on international migration: editorial introduction," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 1-5, August.

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