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Labour Market Dynamics in Australia

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  • Wesselbaum, Dennis

Abstract

This paper estimates a stylized search and matching model on data for Australia covering the period 1978-2008. Using Bayesian methods we find that the model does a fairly good job in replicating the data. Surprisingly, we find a large value for the worker’s bargaining power and low vacancy posting costs. The model generates a strong Beveridge curve and matches the standard deviations of all variables but vacancies. We identify technology and separation shocks to be the main driver of fluctuations.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/47771/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 47771.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:47771

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Related research

Keywords: Bayesian Methods; Business Cycle Fluctuations; Search and Matching; Unemployment.;

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  1. Thomas Lubik & Michael Krause, 2003. "The (Ir)relevance of Real Wage Rigidity in the New Keynesian Model with Search Frictions," Economics Working Paper Archive 504, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics.
  2. Blanchard, Olivier J & Galí, Jordi, 2008. "Labour Markets and Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Model with Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 6765, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Natalia Ponomareva & Jeffrey Sheen, 2010. "Cyclical Flows in Australian Labour Markets," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(s1), pages 35-48, 09.
  4. Dale T. Mortensen & Christopher A. Pissarides, 1993. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0110, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Phillip Chindamo & Lawrence Uren, 2010. "Vacancies and Unemployment in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(2), pages 136-152.
  6. Merz, Monika, 1995. "Search in the labor market and the real business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 269-300, November.
  7. Hagedorn, Marcus & Manovskii, Iourii, 2008. "The cyclical behavior of equilibrium unemployment and vacancies revisited," Working Paper Series 0853, European Central Bank.
  8. Antonella Trigari, 2006. "The Role of Search Frictions and Bargaining for Inflation Dynamics," Working Papers 304, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  9. Sheen, Jeffrey & Wang, Ben Z., 2014. "An Estimated Small Open Economy Model with Labour Market Frictions," Dynare Working Papers 35, CEPREMAP.
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