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The Impact of Social Security on Household Welfare: Evidence from a Transition Country

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  • Nguyen Viet, Cuong

Abstract

Although there is no doubt that social security can help poverty reduction, their effect on poverty reduction can vary for different situations. This paper uses fixed-effects regression to estimate the effects of social security transfers including contributory pensions and social allowances on consumption expenditure of receiving households, and subsequently investigates the impact of the social security transfers on poverty in Vietnam. It is found that both pensions and social allowances increase expenditure of households, especially expenditure on non-food consumption. Pensions have a higher effect on expenditure than social allowances. Pensions and social allowances reduce poverty of the recipients as well as the whole population.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 40777.

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Date of creation: 26 Sep 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40777

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Keywords: Social security; pensions; social allowances; poverty; household welfare; Vietnam;

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  1. Van de Walle, Dominique, 2002. "The static and dynamic incidence of Vietnam's public safety net," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2791, The World Bank.
  2. Hoddinott, John & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "The Impact of PROGRESA on Food Consumption," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 37-61, October.
  3. Behrman, Jere R. & Hoddinott, John, 2001. "An evaluation of the impact of PROGRESA on pre-school child height," FCND briefs 104, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Andrew Goudie & Paul Ladd, 1999. "Economic growth, poverty and inequality," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 177-195.
  5. Giang, Thanh Long, 2004. "The Pension Scheme in Vietnam: Current Status and Challenges in an Aging Society," MPRA Paper 969, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Heckman, James J. & Lalonde, Robert J. & Smith, Jeffrey A., 1999. "The economics and econometrics of active labor market programs," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 31, pages 1865-2097 Elsevier.
  7. Ayele Gelan, 2006. "Cash or Food Aid? A General Equilibrium Analysis for Ethiopia," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(5), pages 601-624, 09.
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