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South-South Migration and Human Development: Reflections on African Experiences

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  • Bakewell, Oliver
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    Abstract

    This paper looks at the relationship between migration between developing countries – or countries of the global ‘South’ – and processes of human development. The paper offers a critical analysis of the concept of South-South migration and draws attention to four fundamental problems. The paper then gives a broad overview of the changing patterns of migration in developing regions, with a particular focus on mobility within the African continent. It outlines some of the economic, social and political drivers of migration within poor regions, noting that these are also drivers of migration in the rest of the world. It also highlights the role of the state in influencing people’s movements and the outcomes of migration. The paper highlights the distinctive contribution that migration within developing regions makes to human development in terms of income, human capital and broader processes of social and political change. The paper concludes that the analysis of migration in poorer regions of the world and its relationship with human development requires much more data than is currently available.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 19185.

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    Date of creation: 01 Apr 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:19185

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    Keywords: Migration; South-South migration; Africa; Human development;

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    References

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    1. Taylor, J. Edward & Wouterse, Fleur, 2006. "Migration and Income Diversification Evidence from Burkina Faso," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia, International Association of Agricultural Economists 25379, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Stark, Oded, 1984. "Rural-to-Urban Migration in LDCs: A Relative Deprivation Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 475-86, April.
    3. Stark, Oded & Lucas, Robert E B, 1988. "Migration, Remittances, and the Family," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(3), pages 465-81, April.
    4. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Stark, Oded, 1989. "Consumption Smoothing, Migration, and Marriage: Evidence from Rural India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 905-26, August.
    5. Kate Hampshire, 2002. "Fulani on the Move: Seasonal Economic Migration in the Sahel as a Social Process," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(5), pages 15-36.
    6. Lipton, Michael, 1980. "Migration from rural areas of poor countries: The impact on rural productivity and income distribution," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 1-24, January.
    7. Michael Clemens, 2007. "Do Visas Kill? Health Effects of African Health Professional Emigration," Working Papers, Center for Global Development 114, Center for Global Development.
    8. Taylor, J Edward & Rozelle, Scott & de Brauw, Alan, 2003. "Migration and Incomes in Source Communities: A New Economics of Migration Perspective from China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 75-101, October.
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    Cited by:
    1. Oliver Bakewell, 2009. "Migration, Diasporas and Development: Some Critical Perspectives," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 229(6), pages 787-802, December.
    2. Isabel Ortiz & Matthew Cummins, 2012. "L’Inégalité Mondiale: La Répartition des Revenus dans 141 Pays," Working papers, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy 1103, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    3. Van Hear, Nicholas & Brubaker, Rebecca & Bessa, Thais, 2009. "Managing mobility for human development: the growing salience of mixed migration," MPRA Paper 19202, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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