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Remittances: Dutch disease or export-led growth?

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  • Ghada Fayad

Abstract

The literature on remittances and growth has thus far established a positive link between remittances and overall economic growth in recipient countries. We identify the main transmission channel through which remittances seem to exert their growth-enhancing effects: the 'export-led growth' channel using a methodology that exploits both cross-country and within-country cross-industry variation, and correcting for the endogeneity of remittances by constructing a set of external instruments. We find that remittances are conducive to the relative growth of exporting industries within teh manufacturing sector of recipient economies, contrary to what standard Dutch disease theory suggests. In doing so, we control for the potential complementarity effect between migrant networks and international trade.

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File URL: http://www.oxcarre.ox.ac.uk/images/stories/papers/ResearchPapers/oxcarrerp201157.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford in its series OxCarre Working Papers with number 057.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:057

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Keywords: Remittances; manufacturing; export-led growth; Dutch disease; migrant networks;

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  1. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Mehdi Raissi & Kamiar Mohaddes, 2011. "Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth," IMF Working Papers 11/291, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Mohaddes Kamiar & Raissi Mehdi, 2013. "Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 9(2), pages 99-131, August.

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