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From Inactivity to Work: The Role of Active Labour Market Policies

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  • Stéphane Carcillo
  • David Grubb

Abstract

Many OECD countries have in recent decades experienced periods of relatively rapid growth in nonemployment benefit expenditures and recipiency rates which have not subsequently been reversed. By contrast, in a number of OECD countries the number of unemployment benefit recipients has declined fairly sharply since the mid-1990s. Although national situations for particular benefits vary greatly, a variety of evidence suggests that there is now often substantial scope for bringing people currently in the sick and disabled, lone-parent, old-age and non-categorical social assistance groups into employment. De nombreux pays de l’OCDE ont fait l’expérience ces dernières décennies d’une hausse des prestations de non emploi, tant en termes de dépenses qu’en termes de taux de perception, sans que cette tendance ait été inversée. En comparaison, dans un certain nombre de pays, le nombre de bénéficiaires de prestations de chômage a connu une nette décrue depuis la seconde moitié des années quatre-vingt-dix. Bien que la situation pour chaque type de prestation varie fortement selon les pays, un certain nombre d’éléments suggèrent qu’il existe désormais des marges de manoeuvre pour ramener vers l’emploi des personnes qui bénéficient actuellement de prestations au titre de la maladie, du handicap, de leur statut de parents isolés, de leur âge, ainsi que les bénéficiaires de l’assistance sociale non catégorielle.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/687686456188
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by OECD Publishing in its series OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers with number 36.

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Date of creation: 15 Jun 2006
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Handle: RePEc:oec:elsaab:36-en

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Cited by:
  1. Yin King Fok & Duncan McVicar, 2012. "Did the 2007 Welfare Reforms for Low Income Parents in Australia Increase Welfare Exits?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Lourens Broersma & Arjen Edzes & Jouke van Dijk, 2011. "Have Dutch Municipalities Become More Efficient in Managing the Costs of Social Assistance Dependency? (refereed paper)," ERSA conference papers ersa10p177, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Seamus McGuinness & Philip J. O’Connell & Elish Kelly, 2013. "Carrots, No Stick, No Driver: The Employment Impact of Job Search Assistance in a Regime with Minimal Monitoring and Sanctions," Working Papers, Geary Institute, University College Dublin 201308, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  4. Bruno Crépon & Marc Ferracci & Grégory Jolivet & Gerard J. van den Berg, 2008. "“Active Labor Market Policy Effects in a Dynamic Setting”," Working Papers, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique 2008-25, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  5. Herwig Immervoll & Linda Richardson, 2011. "Redistribution Policy and Inequality Reduction in OECD Countries: What Has Changed in Two Decades?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 122, OECD Publishing.
  6. Martin Biewen & Bernd Fitzenberger & Aderonke Osikominu & Marie Paul, 2012. "The Effectiveness of Public Sponsored Training Revisited: The Importance of Data and Methodological Choices," NRN working papers 2012-09, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  7. David R. Howell & Miriam Rehm, 2009. "Unemployment compensation and high European unemployment: a reassessment with new benefit indicators," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 60-93, Spring.
  8. Herwig Immervoll, 2010. "Minimum Income Benefits in OECD Countries: Policy Design, Effectiveness and Challenges," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 100, OECD Publishing.
  9. Kelly, Elish & McGuinness, Seamus & O'Connell, Philip J., 2011. "What Can Active Labour Market Policies Do?," Papers, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) EC1, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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