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How Does Content Aggregation Affect Users' Search for Information?

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Abstract

The digital revolution has dramatically reduced search costs for information. Consumers can now access information that is aggregated from many sources. We ask whether aggregators encourage users to ``skim" or investigate content in depth. We exploit a contract dispute that led a major aggregator to remove content from a content provider. We find that after the removal, users were less likely to investigate additional content in depth. Further analysis suggests that the presence of information benefited either very national or local content the most. Our study is the first to measure how new communications technology affects information gathered by consumers.

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File URL: http://www.netinst.org/Chiou_Tucker_11_18.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by NET Institute in its series Working Papers with number 11-18.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2011
Date of revision: Oct 2011
Handle: RePEc:net:wpaper:1118

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Web page: http://www.NETinst.org/

Related research

Keywords: News; Online; Search;

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References

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  1. Sinai, Todd & Waldfogel, Joel, 2004. "Geography and the Internet: is the Internet a substitute or a complement for cities?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 1-24, July.
  2. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2010. "Ideological Segregation Online and Offline," NBER Working Papers 15916, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Goldfarb, Avi & Prince, Jeff, 2008. "Internet adoption and usage patterns are different: Implications for the digital divide," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 2-15, March.
  4. J. Yannis Bakos, 1997. "Reducing Buyer Search Costs: Implications for Electronic Marketplaces," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(12), pages 1676-1692, December.
  5. Susan Athey & Emilio Calvano & Joshua Gans, 2013. "The Impact of the Internet on Advertising Markets for News Media," NBER Working Papers 19419, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Larbi Alaoui & Fabrizio Germano, 2012. "Time Scarcity and the Market for News," Working Papers 675, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  2. Stühmeier, Torben, 2012. "Target Advertising and Market Transparency," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62021, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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